Photo journalism – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 13:34:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://knightbilham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-02T220243.831.png Photo journalism – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ 32 32 Collins Ridge Development sees affordable housing units relocated off-site https://knightbilham.com/collins-ridge-development-sees-affordable-housing-units-relocated-off-site/ https://knightbilham.com/collins-ridge-development-sees-affordable-housing-units-relocated-off-site/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 09:02:19 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/collins-ridge-development-sees-affordable-housing-units-relocated-off-site/ https://chapelboroaudio.s3.amazonaws.com/2021/October/19/Collins%20Ridge_WRAP.mp3 An affordable housing project in Hillsborough recently encountered a roadblock. Collins Ridge, a 1,000-unit development, was to have 88 affordable housing units in the neighborhood. Now these units are relocated. The Hillsborough Council of Commissioners initially approved a master plan for the Collins Ridge neighborhood in 2016. Of the more than 1,000 units, 88 […]]]>

An affordable housing project in Hillsborough recently encountered a roadblock. Collins Ridge, a 1,000-unit development, was to have 88 affordable housing units in the neighborhood. Now these units are relocated.

The Hillsborough Council of Commissioners initially approved a master plan for the Collins Ridge neighborhood in 2016.

Of the more than 1,000 units, 88 have been designated as affordable rental units through CASA, a local non-profit organization that provides stable and affordable housing to people who are homeless or at risk.

The developer and CASA initially identified three acres of land on the east end of Orange Grove Street that were well qualified to receive low-income housing tax credits from North Carolina Housing Finance. The site has since been deemed unfit to qualify for the credit program.

Now the developers and CASA have asked to relocate the off-site affordable housing units adjacent to the neighborhood.

At a recent meeting of the Hillsborough Council of Commissioners, the Commissioners expressed their views on this change to the master plan.

Hillsborough Mayor Jenn Weaver said the city needs to think about how to move forward with affordable housing, even if it isn’t in the Collins Ridge area.

“All parties are frustrated and a little disappointed that this CASA home complex has to be moved,” Weaver said.

Hillsborough Commissioner Kathleen Ferguson said she would like to see the three acres of land initially allocated to CASA become green space.

“Moving CASA leaves space,” Ferguson said. “What I’m saying is that doesn’t mean they can add more houses.”

Ferguson said his main concern is making sure CASA agrees with the changes to affordable housing in the neighborhood.

“For me, this is the most important characteristic of Collins Ridge,” Ferguson said. “It’s critically important to our community. CASA brings something that our community does not have and if they are not fully satisfied, in my opinion we have wasted time.

Rachel Eberhard, the CASA real estate developer, said the nonprofit wanted to ensure connectivity was always maintained between the affordable housing site and the larger development.

“We have a proposal to connect to the Freeland Memorial,” said Eberhard. “We were really concerned that we were sort of on the side here and that our residents wouldn’t necessarily have such direct access to some of the amenities of the larger neighborhoods. “

Despite the change in location, Eberhard said CASA was happy with the new site.

Hillsborough Commissioners unanimously approved the resolution to change the Collins Ridge Master Plan.

Photo via City of Hillsborough


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“Printing Hate” details role of American newspapers in lynchings https://knightbilham.com/printing-hate-details-role-of-american-newspapers-in-lynchings/ https://knightbilham.com/printing-hate-details-role-of-american-newspapers-in-lynchings/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 09:00:56 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/printing-hate-details-role-of-american-newspapers-in-lynchings/ American newspapers played a prominent role, from the Reconstruction until the 1960s, in promoting lynchings, massacres and other forms of racist hatred and violence. This legacy is documented in an ambitious new project, launched today, by 58 student journalists. Why is this important: Understanding the deliberate and involuntary roles played by the American media is […]]]>

American newspapers played a prominent role, from the Reconstruction until the 1960s, in promoting lynchings, massacres and other forms of racist hatred and violence. This legacy is documented in an ambitious new project, launched today, by 58 student journalists.

Why is this important: Understanding the deliberate and involuntary roles played by the American media is an essential part of the national examination of systemic racism. It also offers lessons for today’s journalists covering everything from American political movements and the January 6 attacks to human rights abuses in China.

“Some newspapers announced the lynchings to come, often printing the time, date and place where crowds would gather, ”writes DeNeen Brown, associate professor at the University of Maryland and Washington Post reporter who worked with the students, for the inaugural story of the series.

  • “Low-heat fry,” yelled a 1902 Texas newspaper headline. “Set for a barbecue,” read another.
  • The installments include blunt details of the deadly results of crowd behavior.

Details: “Printing Hate” is a collaboration of the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism and the Capital News Service of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism in Maryland.

  • It also includes student reports from the University of Arkansas and HBCU Hampton University, Howard University, Morehouse College, Morgan State University, and North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University.

White Americans were prompted by the headlines to pull black Americans out of their homes, ridicule or torment and flog them, Brown wrote.

  • “Some white journalists would watch, take notes and write compelling stories … as if they were writing about a sporting event …
  • “Many of these reporters failed to identify whites in the crowd or hold government officials accountable by asking tough questions of sheriffs, judges and other local law enforcement officials who withdrew while white crowds attacked blacks. “

Go back: The project was inspired by Brown’s report on the Tulsa Race Massacre in 1921.

  • Beginning in the spring, students used computer methods to examine digital archives containing more than 5,000 journals, then analyzed the data, interviewed descendants and historians, took photos, recorded sound, and created charts and a app for telling stories.

The bottom line: “Students were not the first to discover white newspaper coverage, which was often countered by the black press,” Brown writes. “However, they were able to investigate as a new generation of reporters bringing a 21st century perspective to the project.”

  • “Who better than the journalists of the future to force the calculation of journalism’s past?” Howard Center director Kathy Best told Axios.

And after: Articles will be published Mondays and Thursdays through mid-December on the Howard Center website of Capital News Service as well as on the National Association of Black Journalists news site and on Word in Black.

To note: Axios co-founder and chairman Roy Schwartz and editor-in-chief Margaret Talev are members of the Maryland J-school Visitors Council.


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Skatepark offers a bird’s eye view – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://knightbilham.com/skatepark-offers-a-birds-eye-view-santa-cruz-sentinel/ https://knightbilham.com/skatepark-offers-a-birds-eye-view-santa-cruz-sentinel/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:15:22 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/skatepark-offers-a-birds-eye-view-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Jack Pearson carves in the big bowl at Ken Worhoudt Skate Park (formerly Mike Fox Skate Park) on San Lorenzo Boulevard in Santa Cruz. The park, which opened in 2007, features a full pipe, two bowls, a street course with steps, hubba ledges and metal rails, was designed by Santa Cruz local Zach Wormhoudt, who […]]]>

Jack Pearson carves in the big bowl at Ken Worhoudt Skate Park (formerly Mike Fox Skate Park) on San Lorenzo Boulevard in Santa Cruz. The park, which opened in 2007, features a full pipe, two bowls, a street course with steps, hubba ledges and metal rails, was designed by Santa Cruz local Zach Wormhoudt, who has took over the business when his father Ken passed away in 1997. The park was designed by Charlie Prograce, built by entrepreneur AJ Vasconi, and artwork by Israel Forbes and graphic design by Judy Oyama. Before his passing, Ken Wormhoudt was the world’s first skate park architect and continues to be recognized as the pioneer of skate park planning. His approach, which his son Zach follows to this day, was to involve local skaters in the design of their own park, with the architect providing a realistic sense of options and helping skaters select and organize features that meet their needs. needs. Ken would provide the skaters with play dough and have them work together to design their own ideal park. Ken Wormhoudt designed and supervised the construction of what is widely considered to be one of the world’s first public skateparks at Derby Park in Santa Cruz. He then designed and built over 80 municipal skateparks and provided advice on the planning and design of skatepark facilities to over 460 skateparks in municipalities around the world. (Shmuel Thaler / Santa Cruz Sentinel)


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Audio Astra: Kansans must continue his advocacy for LGBTQ people https://knightbilham.com/audio-astra-kansans-must-continue-his-advocacy-for-lgbtq-people/ https://knightbilham.com/audio-astra-kansans-must-continue-his-advocacy-for-lgbtq-people/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 08:40:04 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/audio-astra-kansans-must-continue-his-advocacy-for-lgbtq-people/ Audio Astra reviews recent audio reports on Kansas news, including podcasts and radio reports. Eric Thomas heads the Kansas Scholastic Press Association and teaches visual journalism and photojournalism at the University of Kansas. “51 years later! “ KPR present, October 10, 2021 Experts often notice that the change in public opinion about gay rights in […]]]>

Audio Astra reviews recent audio reports on Kansas news, including podcasts and radio reports. Eric Thomas heads the Kansas Scholastic Press Association and teaches visual journalism and photojournalism at the University of Kansas.

“51 years later! “

KPR present, October 10, 2021

Experts often notice that the change in public opinion about gay rights in America has been incredibly rapid. In a generation, zoomed gay equality fringe political issue with little public support for a Supreme Court-approved same-sex marriage right. Polls reveal how fast the wind has turned.

This pace of change has been both remarkable and reassuring. As a parent, I’m relieved that my daughter could point out from her high school in Kansas that college students are much more likely to be ostracized for being intolerant of LGBTQ students than to be excluded for being gay themselves. This is from a person born in 2005, the year Kansans voted to ban same-sex marriage. When she becomes an adult, her generation will long ago have earned the right to marry whomever they love.

But is “deserved” the right word for our family, the one that has yet to attend a gay pride event or donate to a charity that explicitly supports LGBTQ rights?

More fundamentally still, is it fair to call this rapid change?

Two interviews this week from “KPR Presents” suggest nuanced answers to these questions about changing attitudes towards equality: the change has been gradual and collaborative while also appearing rapid and confrontational.

In an interview, CJ Janovy, the author of “Nothing better than being at home,” provides a look back at the decade between Kansas banning same-sex marriage and the federal government allowing it. (Full disclosure: Janovy was my first editor here at Kansas Reflector when I started this column before switching to KCUR.) In another interview, Brittany Keegan, the curator of the Watkins History Museum in Lawrence, describes the methodical march towards gay rights on the KU campus and in Lawrence. Both interviews mark “LGBTQ History Month, 51 Years Later”, including “LGBTQ History Month, 51 Years Later”Not a Straight Path: The Fight for Gay Rights in LawrenceAt the Watkins Museum.

(Hearing this excellent interview duo, as well as a third interview with Dr. Kathy Rose-Mockry, Lawrence’s “51 Years Out” events coordinator, makes me wish “KPR Presents” was playing on podcast apps. )

Listening to the interviews, it is clear that in reality, the radical cultural change was the product of many incremental changes, and the Allies helped these small steps towards equality. Recounting the community work that has led to legal and public opinion changes, Janovy thanks the allies who wrote checks and “baked lemon bars”. These little acts mattered, she says.

I certainly don’t want to portray myself as a righteous warrior when I wasn’t. However, my professional past contains some of this progressive ally work. One of my proudest moments as a high school journalism teacher was recognizing the voices of those calling for marriage equality.

When I started teaching at the Académie Sainte Thérèse, my journalism students asked the administration to print an opinion piece written by a student who believed her uncle should have the right to marry her partner. male. The administration refused, due to the school’s identity as a Catholic institution. The message was: “Now is not the time for this review.” Years later, another student felt more openness from the administration and felt that a tolerant voice belonged to the newspaper. Her column – still to my amazement – was published in the newspaper, a landmark for her personally, for me as a teacher and for the students at the school.

These incremental elements of advocacy have come up often as I counsel and support young people in student journalism. The Kansas School Press Association, the association where I work, defended The Charger, the student newspaper of the Wabaunsee high school whose work is reviewed by a director to react to a perfectly reasonable set of LGBTQ student profiles in high school.

In my eight years of assisting student journalists, administrators have created further barriers to coverage of LGBTQ issues.

“Recognizing a student’s gender identity would unlawfully violate his privacy, even if he and his parents consent,” school principals falsely claim. Or they say, “Allowing students to change their names in the yearbook after their transition sets a dangerous precedent.” Each local effort requires its own plan on the part of student journalists, their advisers, and our organization.

These efforts are but skirmishes over the war stories that Keegan describes in his museum exhibit. She describes how KU’s early LGBTQ student groups fought for recognition from administrators who claimed that “illegal” behavior could not be tolerated by the university, in a mistake while bans sodomy was still in effect. Once that university barrier fell, activists fought the claim that funding could not be allocated to their student organization. Opposing the state’s largest university decades ago, at a time when gay rights lacked popular support, required more courage, and produced greater gains than almost anything we do. can do in 2021.

The 51 years celebrated this month should not be seen as a finish line for any Kansan, whether LGBTQ or straight. Decades of gradual and collaborative change formed this moment in 2021 – a better time for the LGBTQ community than decades before.

However, we – as organizers and allies, as journalists and activists – still have work to do.

What did we miss? E-mail [email protected] to tell us about a Kansas-based audio program that would be of interest to Audio Astra players.


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AP Week in pictures: Middle East https://knightbilham.com/ap-week-in-pictures-middle-east/ https://knightbilham.com/ap-week-in-pictures-middle-east/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 12:21:59 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/ap-week-in-pictures-middle-east/ The Associated Press 14 October 2021 GMT https://apnews.com/article/afghanistan-taliban-middle-east-israel-56053f8849f500636469934d7b2133af This photo gallery highlights some of the most compelling images taken or published by Associated Press photographers in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan between October 7 and October 13, 2021. This week’s selection includes scenes from across the region, centered on the heart-wrenching life in Afghanistan […]]]>

The Associated Press

14 October 2021 GMT

This photo gallery highlights some of the most compelling images taken or published by Associated Press photographers in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan between October 7 and October 13, 2021.

This week’s selection includes scenes from across the region, centered on the heart-wrenching life in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Now the undisputed rulers of Afghanistan, the Taliban aim to eradicate the scourge of drug addiction, even by force. In Israel, members of the Extinction Rebellion Red Rebel Brigade have called for action on climate change in Tel Aviv. Iraq closed its airspace and land border crossings as voters went to the polls to elect a parliament that many hope will bring much-needed reforms after decades of conflict and mismanagement.

The gallery was curated by Oded Balilty, AP’s chief photographer for Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, and Dusan Vranic, AP’s deputy news director for photos and storytelling.

Follow AP Visual Journalism:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/apnews

AP Images on Twitter: http://twitter.com/AP_Images

AP Images blog: http://apimagesblog.com



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Bushfire threatens homes in San Jose foothills https://knightbilham.com/bushfire-threatens-homes-in-san-jose-foothills/ https://knightbilham.com/bushfire-threatens-homes-in-san-jose-foothills/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 00:18:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/bushfire-threatens-homes-in-san-jose-foothills/ SAN JOSE – Crews battled a bushfire in the San Jose foothills Monday afternoon. The fire was reported just before 3:30 p.m. near Sierra Road and Varner Court, San Jose Fire Captain Jesse Allread said. “With the winds we have today, it has spread quickly,” Allread said in an interview at the scene. Allread said […]]]>

SAN JOSE – Crews battled a bushfire in the San Jose foothills Monday afternoon.

The fire was reported just before 3:30 p.m. near Sierra Road and Varner Court, San Jose Fire Captain Jesse Allread said.

“With the winds we have today, it has spread quickly,” Allread said in an interview at the scene.

Allread said the blaze covered seven acres and threatened 10 to 15 homes on Suncrest Avenue, as well as a school and church.

There were no immediate reports of injury or damage. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Check back for updates.


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Cecil Williams among panelists to discuss photojournalism at CofC https://knightbilham.com/cecil-williams-among-panelists-to-discuss-photojournalism-at-cofc/ https://knightbilham.com/cecil-williams-among-panelists-to-discuss-photojournalism-at-cofc/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 17:14:58 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/cecil-williams-among-panelists-to-discuss-photojournalism-at-cofc/ Legendary South Carolina photojournalist Cecil Williams will join photojournalists and academics at the College of Charleston on Wednesday to discuss the evolving field and the challenges of today’s media environment. Part of South Carolina Humanities’ “Picturing Democracy” series, the “The Future of Photojournalism” panel takes place at 6 pm October 13 at the Sottile Theater. […]]]>

Legendary South Carolina photojournalist Cecil Williams will join photojournalists and academics at the College of Charleston on Wednesday to discuss the evolving field and the challenges of today’s media environment.

Part of South Carolina Humanities’ “Picturing Democracy” series, the “The Future of Photojournalism” panel takes place at 6 pm October 13 at the Sottile Theater. The session will be moderated by Tara Mortensen, Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina. In addition to Williams, national independent photojournalist (and City paper contributor) Sean Rayford joins the panel, along with Kyser Lough, associate professor of journalism at the University of Georgia.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required through Eventbrite.

Williams, who grew up in Orangeburg, captured images of South Carolina during the civil rights era, often chronicling young black men and women resisting and protesting Jim Crow’s segregation laws. Williams’ images recorded the early work of future South Carolina rulers like Congressman James Clyburn, former Charlotte Mayor Harvey Gantt, former Judge Matthew Perry and others.

Williams, now 83, told a Smithsonian Institution oral history that growing up in Orangeburg, “in the shadows” of South Carolina State University and Claflin University, all two of the historically black colleges, influenced his life experience and professional work.

In 2019, Williams founded the Independent South Carolina Civil Rights Museum in Orangeburg. His work forms a large part of the museum’s collection.

Panelists will discuss the democratization of photojournalism and the “deprofessionalization of photojournalism,” as well as riffs on the future of the field of panelists whose careers will likely span over a century of photography and analysis by Caroline du journalists. South.


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Afghan refugees arrive in Vancouver https://knightbilham.com/afghan-refugees-arrive-in-vancouver/ https://knightbilham.com/afghan-refugees-arrive-in-vancouver/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 13:04:37 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/afghan-refugees-arrive-in-vancouver/ As Afghan refugees resettle across the United States, around 100 will settle in Vancouver over the next six months, according to local resettlement agency Lutheran Community Services Northwest. Vancouver is one of several cities in the state to resettle Afghans fleeing their country since the withdrawal of US troops. According to the US State Department, […]]]>

As Afghan refugees resettle across the United States, around 100 will settle in Vancouver over the next six months, according to local resettlement agency Lutheran Community Services Northwest.

Vancouver is one of several cities in the state to resettle Afghans fleeing their country since the withdrawal of US troops. According to the US State Department, out of an initial group of 37,000 Afghan refugees, 1,679 will resettle in Washington. Forty-nine members of this initial group will be placed in Vancouver over the next two weeks.

In Washington, the vast majority of refugees are placed in King County, followed by Pierce, Snohomish and Spokane counties, according to the State Department of Health and Human Services.

Some have started to arrive in the Tacoma and Seattle areas, said Matt Misterek, spokesperson for Lutheran Community Services Northwest, but “the wave has yet to strike.” Sometimes the relocation agency may only have 24 hours notice before a family arrives at the airport.

David Duea, CEO of Lutheran Community Services Northwest, said resettlement can be a very complex process to help refugees acclimatize to various facets of American life. Resettlement agencies try to find them accommodation, enroll children in school, put them in contact with job offers or translators, teach them how to use public transport and even to fill their refrigerators with familiar foods.


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The San Antonio College Ranger launched a career as a journalist for decades https://knightbilham.com/the-san-antonio-college-ranger-launched-a-career-as-a-journalist-for-decades/ https://knightbilham.com/the-san-antonio-college-ranger-launched-a-career-as-a-journalist-for-decades/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 09:13:33 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/the-san-antonio-college-ranger-launched-a-career-as-a-journalist-for-decades/ Computers line the walls of Room 212 inside Gonzales Hall at San Antonio College, where Sergio Medina runs The Ranger, the student news organization that is set to cease operations in December after 95 years. A day after telling the story of the upcoming shutdown, Medina sat in the middle of the nearly empty classroom, […]]]>

Computers line the walls of Room 212 inside Gonzales Hall at San Antonio College, where Sergio Medina runs The Ranger, the student news organization that is set to cease operations in December after 95 years.

A day after telling the story of the upcoming shutdown, Medina sat in the middle of the nearly empty classroom, sporting the Ranger’s Class of 2020 t-shirt and called the administrators to determine the rest of the post. and the program that had given him a home.

As editor-in-chief, Medina and a declining number of student journalists carry on a campus tradition admired for decades for its seriousness and credibility. But in a college district that has grown rapidly in recent years, SAC’s journalism program has been scaled back. Budget cuts had already forced the weekly to go fully online in 2019.


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The 2021 US Open is underway and this is what its tennis stadium looks like from space https://knightbilham.com/the-2021-us-open-is-underway-and-this-is-what-its-tennis-stadium-looks-like-from-space/ https://knightbilham.com/the-2021-us-open-is-underway-and-this-is-what-its-tennis-stadium-looks-like-from-space/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 21:44:47 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/the-2021-us-open-is-underway-and-this-is-what-its-tennis-stadium-looks-like-from-space/ Satellite image of the US Open in New York, New York, viewed via a Maxar Technologies satellite on August 30, 2021. (Image credit: Maxar Technologies) The US Open Tennis Championship kicked off Monday, August 30 at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York City – and the stadium can be viewed from […]]]>

Satellite image of the US Open in New York, New York, viewed via a Maxar Technologies satellite on August 30, 2021. (Image credit: Maxar Technologies)

The US Open Tennis Championship kicked off Monday, August 30 at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York City – and the stadium can be viewed from space.

Maxar Technologies released a satellite view of the facilities on Monday to celebrate the championship, which is one of the oldest tennis tournaments in the world. The US Open will see the world’s best players come to Flushing, Queens, to participate in the annual event. Chronologically, this is the fourth and final “Grand Slam” tournament of the year, and the Flushing Meadows Park site is one of the largest public tennis courts in the world.



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