Photo journalism – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:06:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://knightbilham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-02T220243.831.png Photo journalism – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ 32 32 Farewell to a legend: David Boyd has passed away https://knightbilham.com/farewell-to-a-legend-david-boyd-has-passed-away/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 20:12:37 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/farewell-to-a-legend-david-boyd-has-passed-away/ Legendary political cartoonist, artist and character David Boyd Sr., 83, died Tuesday after a long illness. A Citadel graduate and U.S. Army veteran, Boyd traveled to Newnan in the 1960s to run the Newnan-Coweta Chamber of Commerce. Later, he tried his hand at private business, but eventually decided to combine his love of politics and […]]]>

Legendary political cartoonist, artist and character David Boyd Sr., 83, died Tuesday after a long illness.

A Citadel graduate and U.S. Army veteran, Boyd traveled to Newnan in the 1960s to run the Newnan-Coweta Chamber of Commerce.

Later, he tried his hand at private business, but eventually decided to combine his love of politics and his talent to embark on a successful career.

Boyd published his first political cartoons in 1968, in The Newnan Times-Herald. The cartoons were so popular that he ended up selling them to several other Georgian newspapers.

He later teamed up with local attorney Gus Wood to create Mark-Morgan Features, a syndicated newspaper service that, in addition to Boyd’s cartoons and comic strips, offered political column, crossword puzzles, a horoscope and a church page. Mark-Morgan’s content has appeared in over 200 newspapers.

“What David was able to accomplish was significant,” said his longtime friend Keith Dunnavant, a historian and author who lives in Newnan. “He was able to leverage his particular art and worldview and turn it into a viable business. He filled Southern newspapers with meaningful commentary on politics.

Dunnavant first met Boyd in the spring of 1992, shortly after moving to Newnan. Boyd was behind the counter at The Print Shoppe on East Washington Street when Dunnavant dropped by to have some business cards printed.

They struck up a conversation over a photo of Jack Kemp hanging on the store’s wall, discovering not only a similar political philosophy but also several common acquaintances.

“The next thing I knew was that we had been sitting there for about two hours,” Dunnavant said.

Boyd asked Dunnavant if he was hungry and invited him to lunch at a new restaurant, the Redneck Gourmet – an establishment at which Boyd held court for many years.

“It was a red day in my life,” Dunnavant said. “Ninety percent of the people I met in Newnan, I met them at the Redneck Gourmet counter.”

Boyd was renowned for his political cartoons – in 1982 he became the first freelance artist to win a Green Eyeshade Award for excellence in journalism – but his illustrations also appeared in books and magazines and on greeting cards.

He lent his considerable drawing skills to the books of famed comedian Lewis Grizzard and created a whole host of iconic characters for comedian Jeff Foxworthy’s “You Might Be a Redneck” books and merchandise.

But Boyd’s real passion was politics. His scathing cartoon commentary made him the enemies of a wide range of public figures, some of whom sought him out for a confrontation and left his presence after making a new friend. Others were greatly amused by his depictions of them.

One was an Atlanta politician who received multiple DUIs and was grilled by Boyd in one of his cartoons.

“Some time after, the politician, who had a sense of humor, came to get David because he wanted the original of this cartoon,” Dunnavant said. “He was able to twist the politicians, and a lot of them were able to crack a joke because they understood that (Boyd) was an important part of the whole process.”

Boyd thrived on the furor and controversy he created and the people he met as a result, according to a 2016 article in The Newnan Times-Herald, written after announcing his retirement from the cartoon business. .

“A few of these people reached out to me and I got to know them, and we became friends,” Boyd told writer Alex McRae.

McRae was also a close friend, dating back to 1976 when McRae first moved to Newnan.

“We became lifelong friends, and I can’t imagine how things would have gone for me without Boyd,” McRae said. “He could always pick me up when I was down and pick me up when I was down. He was my rock when things weren’t going my way.

McRae said he and Boyd had many adventures together on the road over the years, but “we both swore we wouldn’t divulge some of the stupid things we did.”

These stories may remain untold, but other Boyd stories abound, many of which center on his passionate beliefs, infectious zest for life and cunning sense of humor, Dunnavant said. A running joke involved Boyd’s uncanny talent for cheating death.

As a young man, Boyd survived a tragic car accident. Later, he triumphed over a cerebral hemorrhage and cancer. He even crashed his own car in downtown Newnan.

“He’s had more lives than any cat you know,” Dunnavant said. “David survived very close calls and had a good, rich and vibrant life.”

Boyd will be greatly missed, his friends say.

“We used to watch election returns together, so it will definitely be different in November,” Dunnavant said.

“His passing leaves a huge hole in my life,” McRae said.

Boyd leaves behind his wife, Rosalyn, three children and seven grandchildren.

David Boyd Sr.’s family, seated, surround him during the 2017 opening of The Boyd Gallery. Left to right, Bonne Boyd Bedingfield, Rosalyn Moore Boyd McKoon, Rosalyn Boyd and David Boyd Jr. (PHOTO COURTESY PURE GRIN PHOTOGRAPHY)

Screen-Shot-2022-09-20-at-4.15.54-PM.png?mtime=20220920161656#asset:78629David Boyd was recently featured in “Artists Are Welcomed Here”, a short documentary by Jonathan and Maggie Hickman. CLICK HERE TO WATCH

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What we lose when Kansas college graduates drift to surrounding states https://knightbilham.com/what-we-lose-when-kansas-college-graduates-drift-to-surrounding-states/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 08:45:21 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/what-we-lose-when-kansas-college-graduates-drift-to-surrounding-states/ Kansas Reflector welcomes opinion pieces from writers who share our goal of expanding the conversation about how public policy affects the daily lives of people across our state. Eric Thomas directs the Kansas Scholastic Press Association and teaches visual journalism and photojournalism at the University of Kansas. When a government invests in a bridge, that […]]]>

Kansas Reflector welcomes opinion pieces from writers who share our goal of expanding the conversation about how public policy affects the daily lives of people across our state. Eric Thomas directs the Kansas Scholastic Press Association and teaches visual journalism and photojournalism at the University of Kansas.

When a government invests in a bridge, that bridge serves its purpose in the same place, of course, for its entire lifespan. Ditto for most other public investments, from small (a stop) to large (a medical center). Benefits spent by a state, city, or town accrue to the residents of that region.

But what about education?

It is clear that funding vibrant schools helps the surrounding community, the real estate market and, most directly and most importantly, the students themselves.

However, we are crossing our fingers that Kansas students, upon graduation, will stay here in Kansas. We hope their enriched brains will help our cities thrive. We hope they start a new non-profit medical center or business, maybe one that makes stop signs.

This downstream benefit of education — that a state government can overburden its youth — relies on students to pack up their apartments in Lawrence, Manhattan, and Hays and move to Salina, Leawood, and Dodge City.

The alternative is the dreaded brain drain: the possibility that students could move to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, rather than Pittsburgh, Kansas. And a recent national survey on the news of the brain drain was grim for Kansas.

The National Bureau of Economic Research published “Graduates on the move: Measuring college-specific labor markets for graduates” in May, and the Washington Post published two data visualizations this week.

If you haven’t clicked on the links to the study yet, try to guess where Kansas ranks among the 50 states and Washington, D.C. How do you predict it compares to its neighbours: Missouri, Colorado and Nebraska ? Where do Kansas students move if they leave the state?

As you consider this, let’s admire how the study extracted its data. Using the professional networking website LinkedIn, the study aggregated “information on alumni geographic locations for nearly every public and private nonprofit college and university in the United States.” The data echoes previous government studies that track graduates and the location of their jobs.

The advantage of considering this study rather than the previous ones? The researchers say their “data cover a wider range of institutions and are available for finer geographic levels.”

The researchers also caught my attention with this observation: “Increased mobility of college graduates over time has contributed to declining state appropriations over the past 40 years. … Taxpayer support for public funding of higher education depends on the return on investment.

As one of the many college employees in Kansas who has often been eager for a raise, he was curious to see how our state legislature’s reluctance to fund even modest salary increases might relate to the worker mobility.

As one of the many college employees in Kansas who has often been eager for a raise, he was curious to see how our state legislature’s reluctance to fund even modest salary increases might relate to the worker mobility.

Now that I’ve given you a moment to predict how Kansas will perform, let’s dive into it.

Kansas was the fifth-worst country in retaining college graduates, with the state losing 47.2% more college graduates than it gains. The only states that did worse were geographically concentrated in the northeast: Rhode Island, New Hampshire, West Virginia and Vermont.

These states could easily ignore these findings, because three of these states are geographically small, so it is less likely that graduates will be able to find employment there. After all, there are only a limited number of jobs in Rhode Island, especially if you aspire to rare work – like, say, redesigning stop signs.

It is disturbing that Kansas, a great state in the Midwest, finds itself in such ignominious company.

In a second visualization, the Post showed where the students ended up. Kansas also falls to the bottom of the list here, with substantial flights to Missouri, Texas, Colorado and California. Kansas graduates are migrating east to Missouri in predictable but troubling numbers.

“About 50% of recent college graduates live and work in the metropolitan area closest to the institution they attended,” the study says.

We all know that the Kansas City metro area attracts the Jayhawks, Wildcats and Shockers. In addition to migration like this draining the state of the intellect, it also robs the state of tax revenue from workers who are likely to earn hundreds of thousands of dollars more than non-graduates in the course of their career.

States profiting from the brain drain? States like Colorado, New York, Washington and California all attract 20% more college graduates than they lose.

In the days following the new research, I wondered what future grads thought about choosing their post-campus home.

Luckily, I found myself this week in the perfect place to put them down. I shared dinner with seven University of Kansas students, all from Kansas State. These students, thanks to win scholarships in school journalism schoolare among the brightest young students in our state.

It didn’t take much to get them talking.

Students who planned to stay in Kansas appreciated the chance to start families where they themselves had grown up, whether in Wichita or Emporia. They agreed with their fellow students — those considering moving — that Kansas is a place to settle, not a place to adventure.

Of the students planning to leave, some said they planned to return to Kansas after spending time in other states. However, reflecting on my post-college diversions across the country and retracing the paths of my friends, it’s clear: if you leave the state, you’re much less likely to return.

The most logical answer to “why leave Kansas?” was the limited number of true metropolitan areas to choose from. It’s really just Wichita and Kansas City, said one student (disregarding the fact that much of Kansas City is in Missouri).

Most common in their responses was a wanderlust that Kansas cannot satisfy. “There was a sense of freedom in New York and no judgment,” said one student of his recent wanderings on the streets of Manhattan (the one in New York). “The strangest thing here is nothing there.”

Students said they felt a bit suffocated by Kansas because they thought it was seamless. Their feeling of claustrophobia was a combination of living here and recognizing that Kansas isn’t as diverse as many other states.

Their feelings, shared over iced tea and cheesecake, underscore the complexity of slowing, let alone reversing, Kansas’ brain drain. A singular solution—a new economic incentive or a new company moving its headquarters—doesn’t deliver what most new Kansas grads want at the start of their lives: a different kind of Kansas.

The daunting complexity of changing the Kansas culture doesn’t mean we give up and help our new grads pack their U-Hauls for Denver and Houston. Instead, it suggests the urgency of progressively creating a Kansas that is a destination, not an exit, for our brightest minds.

Through its opinion section, the Kansas Reflector works to amplify the voices of people who are affected by public policies or excluded from public debate. Find information, including how to submit your own review, here.

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First-of-its-kind Media Studies Lab Launches at USC to Amplify Black Social Changemakers on the West Coast https://knightbilham.com/first-of-its-kind-media-studies-lab-launches-at-usc-to-amplify-black-social-changemakers-on-the-west-coast/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 21:54:38 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/first-of-its-kind-media-studies-lab-launches-at-usc-to-amplify-black-social-changemakers-on-the-west-coast/ Photo by Alan Mittelstaedt Amid growing calls to restrict programs that engage critical race theory in American classrooms, journalism teacher and award-winning scholar Allissa V. Richardson founded the Charlotta Bass Journalism & Justice Lab at USC Annenberg. School for Communication and Journalism to Preserve Black Media and Amplify Black Media Creators, Activists, and Social Changemakers. […]]]>

Photo by Alan Mittelstaedt

Amid growing calls to restrict programs that engage critical race theory in American classrooms, journalism teacher and award-winning scholar Allissa V. Richardson founded the Charlotta Bass Journalism & Justice Lab at USC Annenberg. School for Communication and Journalism to Preserve Black Media and Amplify Black Media Creators, Activists, and Social Changemakers.

As the University of Southern California’s premier center for media studies dedicated to safeguarding, studying, and sharing the work of prominent and hidden figures who have played pivotal roles in social justice movements black people in America, the Bass Lab will create a web archive that will serve as a repository for black media and activist journalism. The archive will include digitized newspapers, magazines, photojournalism, and digitized 3D objects that tell the story of Black life and culture on the West Coast. Original content in the form of recorded interviews and oral histories will also be featured.

“The Bass LabThe pioneering mission of combines traditional journalism with innovative media-making technologies to capture and preserve the many voices of racial and social justice movements,” USC Annenberg Dean Willow Bay said. “It will undoubtedly become a primary destination for black media makers, scholars and journalists.”

Richardson, the best-selling author of Bearing Witness While Black: African Americans, Smartphones and the New Social Justice #Journalism, will serve as the lab’s first director.

“When most people think of civil rights, they don’t tend to think of Washington, Oregon and California as hotspots for black activism – but the black press tells us a different story” , said Richardson, associate professor of journalism and communication. “For the first time in history, we are building a clearinghouse that will bring together black social justice journalism – in all its formats – while raising the voices of the people who have done it.”

The Bass Fellowship, which aims to increase the pool of talented industry journalists who are willing to report on issues of race and social justice, will be the lab’s first academic initiative. Select USC students will be trained to produce original audio, video, and photographic content and hone their skills in newsgathering, photogrammetry, drone photography, and podcasting. This content will be collected and curated for the Lab’s website, its future mobile application and the The Voices of a Movement “Virtual Humans” exhibit, which will be featured on the USC University Park campus during Black History Month in February 2023.

The concept of virtual humans was pioneered by the USC Shoah Foundation through its exhibition Dimensions in Testimony. Dimensions allows visitors to “speak” with Holocaust survivors through advanced recording and display technology. When people ask a virtual human a question on screen, the software retrieves the appropriate video clip from a previously filmed interview as an answer.

“Over the past two years, black America has lost so many of its history makers – civil rights leaders, such as Rep. John Lewis and CT Vivian, and socially conscious actors, like Nichelle Nichols and Cicely Tyson “, said Richardson. “There has never been a more imperative time to capture the voices of black icons who are always with us. When we honor them, we help future generations connect the dots between social movements.

The Bass Lab was named in honor of Charlotta Spears Bass, the first black woman to be named vice president of a major American political party. Bass was also the first black woman to own and operate a newspaper on the West Coast. The California Eagle debuted in 1912 and is credited with sparking a mass migration of black Americans from the South and Midwest who sought promise and opportunity in California.

“Charlotte Bass’s pioneering leadership and tireless advocacy for black people helped establish the culture and makeup of the West Coast we know today. Our goal for the lab is to shine a light on the stories of those who carry on this legacy,” said Myah Genung, program manager for the lab.

Bass Lab’s efforts will also include collaborating with various media industry partners to develop academic and experiential programming that will reflect its mission.

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Laura Poitras slams TIFF and Venice for Hillary Clinton documentaries – Deadline https://knightbilham.com/laura-poitras-slams-tiff-and-venice-for-hillary-clinton-documentaries-deadline/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 23:21:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/laura-poitras-slams-tiff-and-venice-for-hillary-clinton-documentaries-deadline/ Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras on Tuesday sharply criticized the Toronto and Venice film festivals for scheduling documentaries linked to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, suggesting the decision borders on a “whitewash” of history. His remarks came at the Toronto Film Festival’s Doc Conference, a day after Poitras’ new documentary, All the beauty and bloodshed, […]]]>

Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras on Tuesday sharply criticized the Toronto and Venice film festivals for scheduling documentaries linked to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, suggesting the decision borders on a “whitewash” of history.

His remarks came at the Toronto Film Festival’s Doc Conference, a day after Poitras’ new documentary, All the beauty and bloodshed, had its North American premiere in Toronto. The film about artist Nan Goldin and his crusade against OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and its owners, the Sackler family, won the Golden Lion at Venice.

Poitras attended Venice, as did Clinton, the latter in support of his Apple TV+ docuseries Bold. Clinton and her daughter Chelsea Clinton then made their way to TIFF, where they unveiled In his handsa Clinton-produced documentary that focuses on one of Afghanistan’s few female mayors.

Laura Poitras attends the premiere of ‘All The Beauty and the Bloodshed’ at TIFF on Monday
Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images

“It’s alarming to see some of the most powerful people in the world, like Hillary Clinton, walking down a red carpet in Venice and at TIFF, and saying nothing,” Poitras said. “And, I would say, indulging in some sort of laundering as well. I mean, Hillary Clinton was actively involved in the wars and occupations in Iraq and Afghanistan. She supported the escalation of the troops.

Poitras pointedly added, “I find it really disturbing that all of this is being forgotten and that we are providing a platform. I mean, documentary is journalism. We stand for facts and hold people accountable. And I don’t understand why there aren’t more questions about what that means… I think we really need to look at what that means for the state of the documentary.

In his hands, directed by Tamana Ayazi and Oscar nominee Marcel Mettelsiefen, is a Netflix title. The streamer is planning an Oscar-qualifying theatrical tour starting Nov. 9; the film will debut on Netflix on November 16.

Poitras said she’s thought “long and hard” about voicing her criticism, saying she doesn’t want to distract from the work of fellow documentarians who premiere films at TIFF. But, referring to Clinton, she said, “I think people in that level of power should be asking some tough questions.”

She framed her criticism in the context of the Justice Department’s ongoing efforts to prosecute Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, the subject of Poitras’ 2016 film. Risk.

Julian Assange WikiLeaks

Julian Assange of WikiLeaks
Reuters

“That’s literally the biggest issue facing journalism in the world right now, that’s the US prosecution of Assange for the Espionage Act,” Poitras said. “There is nothing more serious that threatens the First Amendment, not just in this country, but also threatens journalism around the world, because what the American government is doing is trying to extradite him, bring him back, try him under the Espionage for Publication Act, for literally exposing war crimes in the US occupations of Iraq, Afghanistan.

She continued, “The past few years have been terrifying for journalists. First, the Obama administration – it has mobilized the Espionage Act more than it has ever been used, targeting whistleblowers and journalists. And now it’s not just being passed on to whistleblowers and sources under Obama, it’s now being used against a publisher [Assange].”

Hillary Clinton at the Venice Film Festival

Hillary Clinton Attends Netflix Movie ‘White Noise’ & Venice Film Festival Opening Ceremony Red Carpet
Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images for Netflix

Poitras also suggested it was hypocritical for Venice and TIFF to simultaneously schedule the Clintons’ work while featuring no bear, the latest film by imprisoned Iranian director Jafar Panahi. She noted, “The US government’s efforts to indict and prosecute Assange are, I would say, no different from the imprisonment of Jafar Pahani in Iran.”

Poitras’ interlocutor for the Doc Conference was Thom Powers, TIFF’s chief documentary programmer, who likely played a key role in choosing In his hands for the festival program. Despite the potential awkwardness involved, Powers urged the filmmaker to articulate her review by saying “Use your voice, Laura.” This was greeted with moving applause.

Deadline has contacted Powers for comment, as well as HiddenLight, the Clintons’ production company. We’ve also reached out to Netflix for comment. If we hear from any of these parties, we’ll update our story.

It should be noted that former President Obama, who appeared in Poitras’ comments, is co-founder with Michelle Obama of Higher Ground Productions, which has a deal with Netflix. The company supported an Oscar-winning documentary American factoryand Oscar-nominated doc screaming camp, who have both played numerous film festivals starting with Sundance. Higher Ground also came aboard Descending, an expected Oscar nominee that premiered in January at Sundance. The prospect of festivals avoiding any documentaries associated with the Obamas seems unlikely.

In his handsmeanwhile, will travel from TIFF to the Camden International Film Festival in Maine.

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Rich Abrahamson: A man’s warmth leaves a lasting impression and ultimately a lingering sadness https://knightbilham.com/rich-abrahamson-a-mans-warmth-leaves-a-lasting-impression-and-ultimately-a-lingering-sadness/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:11:16 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/rich-abrahamson-a-mans-warmth-leaves-a-lasting-impression-and-ultimately-a-lingering-sadness/ Dwayne Raymond places a memorial stone in front of the Iraqi Kabab Market at 174 College Ave. in Waterville earlier this month in honor of market owner Akram Mohammad. Mohammad died in a motorcycle accident near the market. “In 55 years, I have never met such a nice person. He would touch your shoulder with […]]]>

Dwayne Raymond places a memorial stone in front of the Iraqi Kabab Market at 174 College Ave. in Waterville earlier this month in honor of market owner Akram Mohammad. Mohammad died in a motorcycle accident near the market. “In 55 years, I have never met such a nice person. He would touch your shoulder with gentle pressure and offer advice, wise beyond his years,” said Raymond, a friend and business owner across the street. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel File

There would be no pictures the day I met Akram Mohammad, owner of the new Iraqi Kabab Market on College Avenue in Waterville.

I had to wait a few months to photograph Mohammad and his family as they cooked Middle Eastern dishes, helped customers and ran their business.

I had walked into the deli on August 31 with a handful of questions and the intention of taking some photos to publicize a new business. “That’s good news,” I explained. “It’s like getting a free ad for your business in a section of the newspaper.”

Mohammad, a 30-year-old Iraqi immigrant and father of two young children, ran the market with his wife. It was their third day in business and he resisted my offer. They would need more time to settle in before accepting photos and answering questions. He said he wanted to meet people in person at the market first. This is where he could shine.

The market had long hours, opening at 11 a.m. and closing at 11 p.m. Several cars were parked in front by a red illuminated sign that scrolled the letters OPEN.

The first customers waited for hot food orders while a woman browsed the merchandise aisles near the kitchen. Mohammad greeted everyone who entered the market. The business was clean and decorated with Middle Eastern paintings and artwork.

A tantalizing aroma wafted through the air as Mohammad’s wife prepared food for customers. Their son Mahdi, 6, smeared his hands with sanitizer while meandering past a crate full of fresh salads, desserts and sides.

Mohammad, known as AJ to his friends, tricked the dark-haired boy into shaking my hand. It was a humorous and warm moment. Like father, like son. I wondered how many times the boy had seen his father extend that greeting to customers. With a friendly handshake and a gentle smile, the man’s warmth and kindness extended to those who entered the store. It was part of the experience.

I’ll never get used to taking no for an answer, but I knew Mohammad wouldn’t be moved. I would come back when the time comes. Then he smiled and we shook him.

The next day I was back on College Avenue, less than half a mile from the market. A man had been killed in an accident between his motorcycle and a van.

The road was closed and traffic diverted while police investigated. Parking at the perimeter of the stage, I entered with a single camera and the longest lens I had. This way I could shoot from a distance while being discreet.

Akram Mohammad, right, is pictured with his two children. Mohammad, an Iraqi immigrant, died earlier this month when his motorcycle collided with a van on College Avenue in Waterville. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Johnson

A photo showing the roadway, police at work, and some elements of the accident might help readers understand what happened. Photos take us to places where words can only describe them.

Adding to the stress of the situation, two people stopped me before I could raise the camera. One person wanted to chat while the other voiced concerns about what my photos might show. “I hope you’re not showing anything too graphic,” she said as she stood with others who gathered to watch the aftermath of the wreckage.

Another person shouted profanity at me from the parking lot of a building near where the motorcycle had broken into two pieces. I retreated to my car as the man grew more agitated. I had seen more than enough. It was horrible and it was time for me to go.

I developed thick skin over 35 years of newspaper photojournalism. I have met people in their worst days – after losing everything, when their house is in ashes or floating downstream in a flood, or when the body of their loved one is shattered by the side of the road. All that remains is to cry. At times like these, my work can either hurt or heal. It becomes part of the problem or part of the solution. My heart remains soft.

AJ Mohammad was only a short distance from his market when his motorcycle collided with the van. I had just met him the day before so my memories were fresh.

He wouldn’t let me pay for the hot chicken shawarma wrap his wife made me. It was cooked fresh and hot when he handed it to me. The cold can of Mountain Dew that I pulled from the cooler was also free. I took my Visa card but he didn’t take it. Next time I’ll pay, but until then I’ll put my card back in my pocket and be grateful.

Mohammad’s death leaves a hole in the hearts of his family and those who knew him far better than me. Following the accident, the community reflected on Mohammad and remembered him as a hard worker who did great things in Iraq’s Kabab market. The business was coming to life. People would stop, try the food and tell their friends about it.

Dwayne Raymond holds a memorial stone in honor of Akram Mohammad, known as AJ to his friends. Raymond placed the stone Sept. 2 outside the Iraqi Kabab Market on College Avenue in Waterville. Mohammad, who died on September 1 in a motorcycle accident, had just opened the market the previous week with his wife. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel File

I was looking forward to going back to the market for the photographs. The date was in my notes and forwarded to my editor. Mohammad would be ready for me. I would be inside during a busy time and would need about 20 minutes to get all the gear I needed.

There would be photos showing a bustling business full of customers. The kitchen would be the model of efficiency with incoming orders and outgoing hot dishes. I’m hoping for a photo of a shopper in the middle of middle eastern grocery items.

Mohammad greeted customers at the door. He shook their hands and offered a kind word with a smile. I would be ready with the camera to honor his joyful spirit while being grateful for the opportunity to have met him, if only for a moment.

Rich Abrahamson is a photojournalist at the Morning Sentinel.


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Teen of the week: Not throwing your shot | News, Sports, Jobs https://knightbilham.com/teen-of-the-week-not-throwing-your-shot-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 05:25:17 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/teen-of-the-week-not-throwing-your-shot-news-sports-jobs/ Kelly Prim cleans the lens of her Canon EOS Rebel T6. (Photo provided) Kelly Prim and boyfriend Morgan Caltrider during Marietta’s Riverfront Roar. Prim took pictures of the boats and the spectators. (Photo provided) Kelly Prim took prom photos for friends Left to right: Sophie Stevens, Elaina Stiers, Morgan Caltrider, Prim, […]]]>



Kelly Prim cleans the lens of her Canon EOS Rebel T6. (Photo provided)

Kelly Prim, 17, is a senior at the Washington County Career Center where she is in the Graphic Design and Video Production (GDVP) program and has a passion for photography.

“I was really interested in photography for a long time” Prim said. “I got my first camera when I was 13 or 14. My stepfather bought me a camera from the pawnshop.”

Prim says her stepfather also loves photography and Photoshop and that’s what got her into it. She said during COVID she couldn’t go to school so she was walking around Marietta taking pictures of random things to pass the time.

“And I was like, I really want to do this, but I wanted to take pictures of people, not just random objects,” Prim said. “So once I got to the Career Center, Mr. Palmer (Chris Palmer, graphic design and video production instructor) helped me learn more things for my camera. I knew how to work it but not so well. I just knew how to take a photo, but he definitely helped me learn the camera tricks.

Prim said she started going to Marietta football and basketball games to take photos, she started taking family photos at their events, then this summer she started taking more of photo shoot type photos.

Kelly Prim and boyfriend Morgan Caltrider during Marietta’s Riverfront Roar. Prim took pictures of the boats and the spectators. (Photo provided)

“So me and my friends Elaina (Stiers), Kendall (Maze) and Kodi (Reynolds) get together sometimes and do photoshoots,” Prim said. “I also shoot seniors, and I also asked a few other people I know if I could do a shoot with them.”

Prim lives with her grandmother, grandfather, aunt, uncle and three cousins ​​in a duplex in Marietta.

“It’s a lot of drama” Prim Jokes. “It’s a duplex so my aunt, uncle and cousins ​​live on one side and me, my grandmother and grandfather on the other. It’s a lot of drama but I love them all.

Prim hopes to follow her passion for photography in college, either at Bowling Green University or Ohio University, where she would like to major in photojournalism. Bowling Green does not offer a photojournalism degree, it only offers a journalism degree with a minor in photography, but does offer an interior design program.

“It has also interested me for a very long time”, Prim said. “Ohio University has photojournalism as a major, so I’m definitely taking that, but it’s more ‘Which one do I really want to go to?'”

Kelly Prim took prom photos for friends Left to right: Sophie Stevens, Elaina Stiers, Morgan Caltrider, Prim, Kendall Maze and Lucas Tome. (Photo provided)

In her spare time, Prim enjoys shopping, camping in the garden, reading WWII and Holocaust documentaries, and going to the beach with her family.

“We go to the beach every year, we go to the Outer Banks (North Carolina),” Prim said. “I literally know the Outer Banks like the back of my hand. We go there for a whole week and I love it so much. It’s so pretty, and I especially love taking pictures there.

Prim says her photographic influences are based on local photographers more than any other.

“I like to go local because it gives me more inspiration” Prim said.

She said MoniKeri Imaging and Cassie Jo Photography were her biggest influences.

Kelly Prim, Mean and BFFs Elaina Stiers and Kendall Maze pose for a photo. Prim often uses her friends for her photos. (Photo provided)

“Because I see their photographs and I’m like, ‘I want to do something like this.'”



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CNN hires former intelligence expert John Miller https://knightbilham.com/cnn-hires-former-intelligence-expert-john-miller/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 20:47:32 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/cnn-hires-former-intelligence-expert-john-miller/ Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. FILE – New York Police Department (NYPD) Assistant Commissioner for Intelligence and Counterterrorism John Miller with Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D.N.Y., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, following a briefing on the impact of President-elect Donald Trump’s protections on New Yorkers. […]]]>

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

FILE – New York Police Department (NYPD) Assistant Commissioner for Intelligence and Counterterrorism John Miller with Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D.N.Y., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, following a briefing on the impact of President-elect Donald Trump’s protections on New Yorkers. Miller, who has held senior positions in law enforcement and journalism, is joining CNN as the network’s chief law enforcement and intelligence analyst, the network announced on Tuesday, September 6, 2022. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

NEW YORK — John Miller, who has held senior positions in law enforcement and journalism, is joining CNN as chief law enforcement and intelligence analyst, the network announced Tuesday.

Miller has worked for both ABC News and CBS News during his career. He also worked at the FBI and most recently was the Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism for the New York Police Department.

As a journalist, he covered the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and before that, while working for ABC News, he conducted an interview with Osama bin Laden. He is co-author of the book “The Cell: Inside the 9/11 Plot”.

“John will help deliver on CNN’s commitment to solving complex issues while presenting audiences with independent, objective information and meaningful analysis across all platforms,” said Chris Licht, CEO and President of CNN Worldwide.

Miller began working Tuesday at the network’s New York office.

A d

Since taking office earlier this year, Licht has tried to steer CNN in the direction of offering more news and less opinion. He’s garnered more attention lately for starts under his watch, such as former “Reliable Sources” host Brian Stelter. Last Friday, CNN White House correspondent John Harwood announced he was leaving.

Harwood had worked at The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal as well as NBC News.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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This Mediterranean city is creating saving shade through innovation https://knightbilham.com/this-mediterranean-city-is-creating-saving-shade-through-innovation/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 16:16:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/this-mediterranean-city-is-creating-saving-shade-through-innovation/ Along the tree-lined sidewalks of Tel Aviv’s Atidim Park, a business and commercial district in the north of the city, a curious new addition to the urban canopy arrived a few months ago. Looking like something between a satellite dish and a ship’s sail, the structure known as LumiWeave is made of an innovative lightweight […]]]>

Along the tree-lined sidewalks of Tel Aviv’s Atidim Park, a business and commercial district in the north of the city, a curious new addition to the urban canopy arrived a few months ago.

Looking like something between a satellite dish and a ship’s sail, the structure known as LumiWeave is made of an innovative lightweight fabric designed to provide shade during the day and solar illumination once the sun sets. sleeps in the Israeli city.

“We want to encourage walking and mobility,” says Gaby Kaminsky, managing director of CityZone, an urban innovation center that is a collaboration between the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality, Tel Aviv University and Atidim Park, a neighborhood that sees 10,000 people pass through. every day. “If people have to stand in the sun, they will sweat and just won’t. So we have to make the city a tolerable place even in hot weather.

cool project

This story is part of Cool Project, a series about the surprising ways cities are reducing heat in a warming world. Read more about the series and the illustrations here.

Despite all of its obvious cooling benefits, shade has often been overlooked by authorities when it comes to reacting to extreme heat. But Tel Aviv, where high summer temperatures can regularly exceed 104 degrees, has highlighted the importance of shade through a number of municipal projects as the world grapples with a rapidly warming planet.

The impact of shadow on the body is unique. It is well established that cities have microclimates called “urban heat islands”, but high air temperatures are not the only cause of heat stress. Research shows that standing in the shade can reduce perceived heat by 15 degrees compared to direct sunlight, significantly mitigating health threats such as cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, heat stroke and even death. . At least 363 Israelis died during heat waves between 2012 and 2020, according to a study by Israel’s Environmental Protection Ministry and Tel Aviv University.

Climate change will lead to more frequent, severe and prolonged heat waves. A study published in the journal Communications Earth and Environment found that 92% of the 165 countries surveyed are projected to experience extremely hot annual temperatures once every two years by 2030 under current national emission reduction commitments. In the pre-industrial era, it was as little as once every hundred years.

Tel Aviv takes these numbers and the role shade can play in mitigating extreme heat seriously. Prior to the launch of LumiWeave, the city developed “shade maps”, which document the shading of public space provided by elements such as buildings, trees, colonnades and pergolas.

According to Or Aleksandrowicz, an assistant professor in the Faculty of Architecture and Urban Planning at the Israel Institute of Technology who led the mapping initiative, the maps allow for rare insight at the street and neighborhood level. “We need more shade, but where and what?” asks Aleksandrowicz, who developed the maps with a small team for several months in 2018 and 2019.

The team used cutting-edge analysis to create an indicator called the Shade Index, which compares shade provision across the city on a scale of 0 to 1. They found classic indicators such as Tree Canopy Cover or Sky ViewFactor. , although easier to calculate at the city level, can distort the daily and annual variance of solar levels. To minimize costs, they also concluded that denser urban areas supplemented by tree planting may be a better approach to urban design than more open spaces, which require many more trees to provide similar levels of d. shadow in the street.

“Trees are something we cherish and want to plant more,” says Aleksandrowicz. “But if you plant them without root space, you’ll have a constant source of problems. Trees require a lot more investment in infrastructure to make room for them.

With Portland’s canopy dwindling, the city ended its street tree planting contract with Friends of Trees. The Oregonian

With Portland’s canopy dwindling, the city ended its street tree planting contract with Friends of Trees.

According to a 2021 report by C40’s Cool Cities Network, accurate mapping of urban trees can be useful not only for mapping shade, but also for understanding the effectiveness of tree planting for climate purposes. . In this regard, Tel Aviv’s shade maps could soon bear fruit: in January, Israel announced that it would plant 450,000 trees in urban areas by 2040 at an estimated cost of 2.25 billion shekels ($676 million).

One problem that Aleksandrowicz’s team highlighted, however, was that they only had 2.5D rather than 3D city-scale mapping of buildings and tree canopies, which which means that the shadow may have been overestimated since it was calculated as maximum during the whole day, regardless of solar orientation. and leaf density. They also called for universal regulations on shade provision which could be used to establish benchmarks.

Sam Bloch, a New York-based journalist who is writing “Shadow,” a book exploring the relationship between shade, climate and inequality, says modern municipalities tend to overlook shade due to technologies such as air conditioning and smart glass that blocks sunlight, as well as the dominance of cars, whose need for wide roads reduces the potential area for sidewalks and gives less space for trees.

“But the shade has this particular value,” Bloch explains. “It’s where people want to be when it’s hot. It maintains common spaces and social ties.

The shadow can also play a role in the fight against inequalities. Bloch says there can be an air temperature difference of 10 to 15 degrees between neighborhoods in the same city due to infrastructure. “There is a distinction between public and private shadow,” he says. “And there is usually shadow poverty in the poorest areas. Cities should react to this. The photo above shows the loss of tree cover in Portland between 2015 and 2020

In various civilizations, the shadow played an important role, according to Bloch. Before the idea of ​​the street tree, the Roman Empire often had arcaded walkways in cities. Historic colonies in the Middle East and North Africa, on the other hand, had very narrow streets, allowing buildings to create shade.

These days, as Tel Aviv leads the way, Bloch says, others are adopting different tactics:

Vienna offers citizens a subsidy to install exterior blinds and awnings; Phoenix turns its black asphalt streets to gray, using a special sealer that reflects rather than absorbs the desert sun; Melbourne supports its shade by recycling gray water; and Singapore has a network of covered walkways for rain and sun protection, as well as regulations stating that at least 50% of public spaces must be shaded during the day.

Back in Tel Aviv, the municipality placed LumiWeave orders for 10 more sites across the city. The fabric, created by designer Anai Green, is embedded with organic photovoltaic solar cells. It requires no electrical infrastructure, saves costs, and can provide nighttime illumination for up to three days without sunlight. But that shouldn’t be a problem as Tel Aviv has an average of around 300 days of sunshine per year.

Alongside LumiWeave, CityZone is working with other Tel Aviv-based start-ups such as SolCold, which has developed a paint – which will be tested later this year – that actively cools when exposed to sunlight, reducing theory temperatures at lower than shade. . BioShade, on the other hand, uses hydroponic systems to grow shade plants up to 10 inches per day, helping to speed up and simplify the process of growing trees.

“We have no time to lose,” says Aleksandrowicz. “We need to use the knowledge we have now for large-scale implementation of shading.”

Peter Yeung is editor of Reasons to be Cheerful. A journalist based in Paris, he also writes for publications such as the Guardian, the LA Times and the BBC. He has filed stories across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

This article is available for The Oregonian/OregonLive via the Solutions Journalism Network.

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Join us for CSUN ‘J-Day’ 2022 on Saturday, October 15 https://knightbilham.com/join-us-for-csun-j-day-2022-on-saturday-october-15/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 19:39:10 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/join-us-for-csun-j-day-2022-on-saturday-october-15/ LA Times High School Insider, CSUN Journalism Department and Journalism Educators Association of Southern California (SCJEA) come together to host our annual Youth Journalism Conference at CSU Northridge. Learn from professionally-led workshops, test your skills in media competitions, and meet in small groups for panel discussions with journalists. A counselor or parent must register on […]]]>

LA Times High School Insider, CSUN Journalism Department and Journalism Educators Association of Southern California (SCJEA) come together to host our annual Youth Journalism Conference at CSU Northridge. Learn from professionally-led workshops, test your skills in media competitions, and meet in small groups for panel discussions with journalists.

A counselor or parent must register on behalf of their student(s) and enter them into contests. The maximum capacity of the event is 200 participants and registration closes Friday, October 7 at 11:59 p.m. (PST).


Event calendar:

October 15: CSUN J-Day

8:30 a.m. Arrival and registration of students (breakfast available)

9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Welcome remarks

9:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Writing and multimedia competition

10:50 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Workshop 1

11:35 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Workshop 2

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. Lunch (provided)

12:50 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Keynote speaker

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Prize giving and closing speeches

Note: A finalized itinerary will be sent to registrants closer to the date, including the names of the speakers.


Contest Details and Guidelines:

The writing and multimedia competitions will be in the categories below. Registration is limited to 5 students per competition and per school:

Competitions:
1. News writing
2. Writing features
3. Writing reviews
4. Sports Writing
5. Photography (news, reports, sports) **
6. Video Journalism/Broadcast **

News, Features, Sports and Opinion entrants will attend a live presentation, write their articles on Google Docs, and submit their entries to their judge via a Google form.

**These competitions require registrants to submit their work by Friday, October 7. Instructions will be provided.

**For the photography competition, each student can submit maximum 1 photo per category — 1 news photo, 1 reportage photo and 1 sports photo. (Students do not have to submit a photo for all 3 categories.)

Registrants can submit their photos with captions to hsinsider@latimes.com by October 7 at 11:59 p.m. PST. Photos should be from this semester.

**For the video contest, each student can submit 1 video. Videos should be between 90 seconds and 2 minutes long.

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Franklin County GOP backs sheriff’s nominee in writing as Dems waver https://knightbilham.com/franklin-county-gop-backs-sheriffs-nominee-in-writing-as-dems-waver/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 20:33:49 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/franklin-county-gop-backs-sheriffs-nominee-in-writing-as-dems-waver/ A Franklin County Sheriff’s Office cruiser parked at the department’s headquarters in St. Albans Town. Photo by Shaun Robinson/VTDigger ST. ALBANS — Weeks after two major political parties called on John Grismore to drop out of the Franklin County sheriff’s race, the local Republican committee voted to back another candidate’s written bid, though Democrats won’t […]]]>
A Franklin County Sheriff’s Office cruiser parked at the department’s headquarters in St. Albans Town. Photo by Shaun Robinson/VTDigger

ST. ALBANS — Weeks after two major political parties called on John Grismore to drop out of the Franklin County sheriff’s race, the local Republican committee voted to back another candidate’s written bid, though Democrats won’t haven’t done the same yet.

Grismore, who is under criminal investigation after he was filmed last month kicking a suspect in police custody, is expected to be the only candidate in the general election ballot for sheriff in November .

Although both sides have expressed a desire to back a single candidate written to challenge Grismore in what is likely to be an uphill battle, reaching consensus on an alternative is proving difficult.

Mark Lauer. Photo courtesy of Mark Lauer

The Republican Franklin County Committee voted unanimously at a Wednesday night meeting at St. Albans City Hall to approve a written campaign for Mark Lauer, a Franklin County Sheriff’s Office lieutenant who identifies as independent. But Democrats hit a dead end by making the same endorsement in the same place the night before.

Republican County Chairman Joe Luneau told his members at their meeting that he feared that unless a joint endorsement with Democrats met soon, any written campaign would be doomed, in especially because voters will soon begin to receive ballots by mail.

“I wouldn’t say it’s impossible, but it’s a tall order,” Luneau told committee members. “And if we don’t have a unison candidate, I think it’s impossible.”

Lauer was hired into the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office in 2017 and currently works with the Northwest Special Investigations Unit, which is responsible for investigating crimes such as sexual assault and child abuse. He previously worked with the Vermont State Police for 27 years, according to his campaign website.

At their Wednesday meeting, Republicans also considered endorsing Gale Messier, who unsuccessfully ran for Franklin County sheriff in 2010. Another potential candidate, Paul Morits, also put his hat in the ring for a written offer, and as of Wednesday night he had campaign signs around St. Albans. But he said this week he was withdrawing his candidacy and urged local parties to support Lauer.

Luneau insisted that all meeting participants who were not members of the committee leave the room for about 10 minutes so that the committee can deliberate and vote in private. He argued that otherwise the members would not be able to speak freely about the candidates. Other attendees included Lauer and the other men who had thrown their hats into the ring for a written offer, as well as a reporter.

Luneau said his committee endorsed Lauer because he had better qualifications than Messier and because members felt Lauer also had a better chance of gaining approval from county Democrats.

Democrats deadlocked

At the start of the Franklin County Democrats meeting Tuesday night, Rep. Mike McCarthy, D-St. Albans, offered to endorse Lauer. After about an hour of discussion, the committee voted 8 to 8, with three abstentions, not endorsing Lauer.

Several members asked about posts they said they saw on Lauer’s social media, which they called “offensive” and disqualifying for local party endorsement.

County Democrats decided to have two members meet with Lauer on Thursday to ask him follow-up questions. The committee had already spoken with Lauer as a group. These members plan to report at a future meeting, in which case the committee may hold another vote.

At Tuesday’s Democratic meeting, member Reier Erickson described seeing a post that “called for peaceful protesters.” In a later interview, member Hadley Priebe — who also spoke at the meeting — pointed to a post on Lauer’s Facebook page from 2018 in which the candidate appears to have written several paragraphs describing “my protest to the protesters.”

Lauer’s post continued, “Instead of bowing and kneeling to the problem, why don’t you get up and work on fixing the problem?”

Erickson said he wouldn’t feel safe protesting in Franklin County knowing the sheriff had posted a message questioning the usefulness of speaking out against injustice.

In an interview Wednesday, Lauer said he was aware that some Democratic committee members had raised concerns about his use of social media, but was “confused” about the nature of their concerns.

He said he did not remember the message about the protesters well enough to comment on it, and hoped meeting with committee members on Thursday would dispel any concerns.

Lauer added that he would “absolutely” be committed to impartial policing if elected. He pointed to a recent post he posted on Facebook showing him buying campaign goods from a black person as proof that he is not racially biased.

“If I’m biased or have a problem, why would I post pictures of this, rather than just buy the product from them and walk away?” Lauer said.

Erickson argued that social media posts he’s seen suggest Lauer doesn’t share Democratic Party values. He urged members to consider not endorsing anyone at all for the position of sheriff.

“We could definitely sit back and let the Republicans approve it and move on,” Erickson said. “But if we approve it, it means that we take on a responsibility.”

John Grismore. Photo courtesy of the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office

Other members, including McCarthy, argued that it was more important for the party to back a write-in candidate who was acceptable to the GOP — like Lauer — in an effort to give county voters a single write-in alternative to Grismore this fall.

“I don’t think Mark Lauer is the perfect candidate for the job of sheriff,” McCarthy said. “What I’ve heard is that he is a capable leader and MPs will support him.”

He added: ‘John Grismore cannot be the sheriff. He cannot be elected to this office – it would simply be disastrous for Franklin County.

Grismore did not respond to a request for comment Thursday afternoon.

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