Photo journalism – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:53:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://knightbilham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-02T220243.831.png Photo journalism – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ 32 32 Senate Bill to Codify the Roes Stalled – What Does the Future of Reproductive Rights Look Like? | KPCC – NPR News for Southern California https://knightbilham.com/senate-bill-to-codify-the-roes-stalled-what-does-the-future-of-reproductive-rights-look-like-kpcc-npr-news-for-southern-california/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:03:45 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/senate-bill-to-codify-the-roes-stalled-what-does-the-future-of-reproductive-rights-look-like-kpcc-npr-news-for-southern-california/ Senate Bill to Codify the Roes Stalled – What Does the Future of Reproductive Rights Look Like? Senate Democrats’ attempt to cement abortion protections into federal law has been wednesday blockedwith all Republicans plus West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin voting against the Women’s Health Protection Act. With a push at the state and federal levels […]]]>

Senate Bill to Codify the Roes Stalled – What Does the Future of Reproductive Rights Look Like?

Senate Democrats’ attempt to cement abortion protections into federal law has been wednesday blockedwith all Republicans plus West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin voting against the Women’s Health Protection Act. With a push at the state and federal levels to respond to the potential overthrow of Roe v. Wade, what should we expect for the future of reproductive rights laws? Experts have pointed out that overturning the long-standing court ruling could affect not only abortions, but also reproductive health care. Today on AirTalk, guest host Austin Cross discusses the future of reproductive rights with Rachel Roubein, Washington Post national health care reporter and author of The Health 202 newsletter and Jennifer Chou, ACLU of Northern California staff attorney.

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Marcus Yam talks about his work

The winners and finalists of Pulitzer Prize 2022 were announced this week, and the winner of Breaking News Photography was Foreign correspondent and photojournalist for the Los Angeles Times Marcus Yam for his photos taken in the days during and after the fall of Kabul, Afghanistan, to the Taliban. The Pulitzer Committee cited Yam’s “crude and urgent images of the United States’ departure from Afghanistan that capture the human cost of historic change in the country.” Today on AirTalk, guest host Austin Cross talks with Yam about his work, what he’s witnessed in Afghanistan and now covering the war in Ukraine, and his journey into photojournalism.

Did you change your Midlife career? What were the challenges and how did you overcome them?

The thought of changing careers in the middle of your life can be daunting. What’s stopping you? Maybe you’re successful at what you’re currently doing, maybe you’re worried about money, or maybe you just feel too old. NFL star Tom Brady announcement that after hanging up his jersey for good, he will become a broadcast analyst for Fox. Although Tom Brady is arguably the best in his field (and quite literally the best in the field), current analysts warn that career change will have its challenges. This goes for anyone changing careers later in life, often known as a callback career. But some experts say a career change in your 40s can be good for your overall well-being. pat pattison, Los Angeles-based career and transition coach and author of Creative You Turn: 9 steps to your new creative life and career“, joins guest host Austin Cross to discuss recall careers. We also want to hear from you! Did you change careers later in life? What were the challenges and how did you overcome them? What impact has the change had on your life and well-being? Call 866-893-5722 or email atcomments@kpcc.org.

Understanding and repairing decades of injustice inflicted on black landowners and residents

The June primary lasts about four weeks, and mail-in ballots have started arriving in homes. At KPCC and LAist, we shift the focus of our political coverage from politicians to voters. To that end, we asked all of you, KPCC listeners and LAist readers, to tell us what’s important to you this election season, and the questions and comments we received largely revolved around four key topics, which we call “problems of destiny”: housing and homelessness, systemic racism, equitable economies and education. So here on AirTalk, we spend the month before the main drill on each of these four areas.

This week we focus on systemic racism. On Tuesday, our reporters told us how systemic racism has factored into the pandemic response and the violence against Asian Americans in Southern California. Yesterday we discussed how systemic racism is considered in some of our laws. Today guest host Austin Cross is joined by UCLA Urban Culture Historian Eric Avila and Kavon District, CEO and Founder of Where is My Earth?who works to recover stolen land from black families, to better understand the policies and practices that for decades have discriminated against predominantly black residents and landowners, and the lasting effects this can have on generational wealth.

KPCC & LAist prepare you for June primary with voter game plan

You should soon receive your ballot for the June primary – if you haven’t received it already. There’s a lot out there, and it might seem like a lot of homework. This is why KPCC and LAist have once again set up a Voter Game Plan – a guide to help you make important decisions—and even track your vote. Today on AirTalk, guest host Austin Cross breaks down what you need to know with KPCC and LAist Civics and Democracy Correspondent Frank Stoltze. Do you have questions about the primary? Call us at 866-893-5722 or email atcomments@kpcc.org.

You can find the LAist Voters Game Plan here.

AirTalk Honors Local Heroes Making a Difference in Southern California

News is a lot to handle right now, so on Airtalk we set aside time each week to talk about some of the positives, like all the good people doing great things in Southern California. We asked you to help us shine a light on your local heroes, and we received many great applications. Today on AirTalk we speak with Roosevelt “Rose” Browna footwear and product designer who runs the Designing Dreams initiative, which offers hands-on design workshops at local schools for young students.

To help us spotlight your local hero, visit kpcc.org/airtalk. You will find a link just below our show description where you can name your local hero. And they could be interviewed here on AirTalk. We hope to make one every week, and we can’t do it without your help.

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Korie “KP” Griggs: The Sprudge Twenty Interview https://knightbilham.com/korie-kp-griggs-the-sprudge-twenty-interview/ Tue, 10 May 2022 12:14:54 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/korie-kp-griggs-the-sprudge-twenty-interview/ Welcome to The Sprudge Twenty Interviews presented by Pacific Barista Series. For a full list of 2022 Sprudge Twenty winners, visit sprudge.com/twenty. “Korie creates spaces for coffee and connection, whether through her budding comic strip Vibranibeans (@vibranibeans), as a founding member of The Color of Coffee Collective (@colorofcoffeecollective), or her coffee-centric Instagram. café @koffeepersonkp She […]]]>

Welcome to The Sprudge Twenty Interviews presented by Pacific Barista Series. For a full list of 2022 Sprudge Twenty winners, visit sprudge.com/twenty.

“Korie creates spaces for coffee and connection, whether through her budding comic strip Vibranibeans (@vibranibeans), as a founding member of The Color of Coffee Collective (@colorofcoffeecollective), or her coffee-centric Instagram. café @koffeepersonkp She embodies vulnerability, advocacy and power through everything she does.

Nominated by Kat Melheim

Do you have a coffee making ritual?

Yes! Making coffee is a form of self-care for me. It kick-starts my day and helps me check in on how I’m doing. If my energy is low, I opt for a cold brew; it’s ready and fast for me. If my energy feels replenished, I take my time making an espresso drink or anything with my Flair.

What is your favorite quality in coffee?

Its versatility and its unifying power. This is real life vibranium to me.

What’s the best song for making coffee right now?

All Eyes On Me by Earthgang

Do you have a favorite item of clothing for making coffee?

Round neck or hoodie for sure.

What was the last cup of coffee you really enjoyed?

A mug of Kris Carlson’s Griefscapes.

What is your idea of ​​the happiness of coffee?

Gatherings of sharing in our cafes or choices with laughter and good conversation in the center.

What coffee issue are you most concerned about?

Accessibility and equity. As a black woman with mobility issues, I see that there are still many barriers within the industry.

What cause or element of coffee motivates you?

Origin stories. I love telling stories and knowing where coffee really comes from.

What issue in coffee do you think is being critically overlooked?

Accessibility for ALL people, regardless of race, gender, disability, experience, etc.

Did you experience a “god shot” or a life-changing moment of coffee revelation early in your life?

Coffee was just always in my house. Its smell has always seduced me even before having tried it.

If you could have a job in the coffee industry, what would it be and why?

Photojournalism. I want to tell the origin stories that are overlooked and untold. I want people to know where coffee really comes from and how to honor and respect it from farm to cup.

Who are your coffee heroes?

Phyllis Johnson; she continues to push for change.

If you could drink coffee with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

My mother. I was only 14 when she died, so we never had the joy of sharing coffee and good conversation. I just wish she could see me now.

Do you have coffee mentors?

Not really. I feel like I’m making a path in this industry that no one is doing, so often I just feel like I’m inventing it as I go along.

What did you wish someone had said to you when you started in coffee?

That there is no ceiling. You can be in coffee regardless of your background or outlook. I wish someone had told me not to believe lies.

Where do you see yourself in 2042?

CILLIN. Drink coffee and write another bestseller to add to my growing list of books!

Thank you!

Sprudge Twenty interviews are presented by Pacific Barista Series. For a full list of 2022 Sprudge Twenty winners, visit sprudge.com/twenty.


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Chittenden County Study I-89 Public Consultation Invited https://knightbilham.com/chittenden-county-study-i-89-public-consultation-invited/ Sun, 08 May 2022 19:03:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/chittenden-county-study-i-89-public-consultation-invited/ The Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission and others are working on a comprehensive plan to improve travel and connections along the busy I-89 corridor. Courtesy picture. Imagine Interstate 89 in Chittenden County to 2050. How will people live and travel the 37-mile corridor more safely, sustainably, and efficiently over the next 28 years and beyond […]]]>
The Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission and others are working on a comprehensive plan to improve travel and connections along the busy I-89 corridor. Courtesy picture.

Imagine Interstate 89 in Chittenden County to 2050. How will people live and travel the 37-mile corridor more safely, sustainably, and efficiently over the next 28 years and beyond ?

The Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission, the Vermont Agency of Transportation and other partners have been working for two years to answer this question. On Tuesday, they will present their findings and invite the public to comment.

The project aims to develop a comprehensive plan for the I-89 corridor that “identifies and prioritizes investments and multimodal strategies to ensure safe, efficient and reliable travel for all people, whether by car, bus, walk or cycle through Interchanges,” said Eleni Churchill, transportation program manager for the planning commission.

It’s about planning for the future, said Dale Azaria, senior fellow at the Conservation Law Foundation who is on the advisory board.

“The biggest challenge was getting attendees to think creatively about a better transportation system, not just more freeway lanes and new exits,” he said in an email. .

Wider freeways with more exits “only encourage more driving, which will steer us in the wrong direction when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, noise, safety and quality of life,” he said.

I-89 in Chittenden County is one of Vermont’s busiest stretches of freeway and an area of ​​continued growth. The Vermont Natural Resources Council sees the study as a way to design better travel routes and make improvements to outings 12, 13 and 14 – and also as “a critical step” to building climate resilience in the Chittenden County, said Kati Gallagher, of the Sustainable Communities Program. board director, who is part of the advisory board.

In partnership with state, county, and nonprofit partners, the study assessed existing traffic and land use conditions along the corridor, created visions and goals, and identified five sets of improvements, such as work on exits to improve bicycle/pedestrian safety and traffic flow. — while keeping in mind the expected growth and funding improvements as a way to reduce future maintenance costs.

“We believe we have developed a balanced plan that looks to the future taking into account climate change, but also the mobility needs of residents, commuters and visitors to our county,” Churchill said.

Highway studies have been done in the past, but none quite like this one, said Joe Segale, director of the office of policy, planning and research at the Vermont Agency of Transportation.

Segale himself conducted one of these studies in 1998, when he worked at the planning commission.

“It wasn’t as complete as this one,” he said. “It takes into account other modes like walking, cycling and public transit, and then it’s integrated with land use…so it’s a very strong study.”

In developing the plan, the commission sought input not only from transportation, business and environmental stakeholders, but also from municipalities and residents through a public process. And he looked at socio-economic data and how the plan might affect marginalized communities.

The biggest challenge? Predicting future travel trends in a post-pandemic world, with so much uncertainty about where people will live and how demographics, land use decisions and new technologies will affect the way they travel, a she declared.

An image of the presentation scheduled for Tuesday’s public meeting on the I-89 2050 plan. Courtesy photo

Goals include improving safety on the freeway and at interchanges, improving access, supporting anticipated economic growth, preserving and improving the condition of I-89, minimizing environmental impacts and promoting compact growth that supports livable, affordable and healthy communities.

For Gallagher, the study was an opportunity to avoid the mistakes of the past. Experience has shown that the increase in capacity for individual cars and the widening of roads have not been sustainable. Stakeholders now have the opportunity to strengthen Vermont’s land use goals and prevent sprawl, she said.

“Implementing Vermont’s smart growth goals is more urgent than ever as we work to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, 40% of which come from transportation,” she said.

The project, which began in May 2019, is in its final stages, with a final public meeting scheduled for Tuesday at 6 p.m. She will be held remotely via Zoom.

Churchill said she hopes people will attend the presentation remotely and provide input into the transportation plan. “Our state-to-state system is important and we want everyone who is interested to have the opportunity to give their opinion,” she said.

The meeting’s response will be included in a draft to be presented to the I-89 advisory committee later this month, and the final report will be released this summer. The plan will be monitored and reassessed periodically to ensure it evolves over time, the planners note in the presentation.

Don’t miss a thing. Sign up here to receive VTDigger’s weekly energy industry and environment email.

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I’m Still Crying About Cincinnati-Area Teen Kyle Plush https://knightbilham.com/im-still-crying-about-cincinnati-area-teen-kyle-plush/ Sat, 07 May 2022 02:17:34 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/im-still-crying-about-cincinnati-area-teen-kyle-plush/ Saturday marked 10 years for me at The Enquirer and Cincinnati.com. Colleague Sharon Coolidge suggested writing about it. And I immediately thought of the stories I’ve covered that have brought me to tears over the past decade. There were two. The 2012 or 2013 homicide of a young man. And the April 2018 death of […]]]>

Saturday marked 10 years for me at The Enquirer and Cincinnati.com.

Colleague Sharon Coolidge suggested writing about it. And I immediately thought of the stories I’ve covered that have brought me to tears over the past decade.

There were two.

The 2012 or 2013 homicide of a young man. And the April 2018 death of teenager Kyle Plush, who suffocated after being pinned under the backseat of his Honda Odyssey.

They still make me cry.

I’m sorry, I can’t remember the name of the kid who was shot dead in the middle of a street in Evanston. He had one and deserves the honor that I say so. I don’t remember his exact age, around 18 or 19. I can’t find any reports of the incident in The Enquirer’s archives, on Cincinnati.com, or anywhere else online.

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El Paso Times Wins Prizes at Texas APME Journalism Contest https://knightbilham.com/el-paso-times-wins-prizes-at-texas-apme-journalism-contest/ Thu, 05 May 2022 07:08:37 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/el-paso-times-wins-prizes-at-texas-apme-journalism-contest/ The El Paso Times won three first-place awards and several other accolades for its coverage of the Haitian border crisis, its investigative work on the Biden administration’s shelters for troubled young migrants, and writing Deadline on the death of former UTEP President Diana Natalicio. “These awards are a team effort,” said editor Tim Archuleta. “We […]]]>

The El Paso Times won three first-place awards and several other accolades for its coverage of the Haitian border crisis, its investigative work on the Biden administration’s shelters for troubled young migrants, and writing Deadline on the death of former UTEP President Diana Natalicio.

“These awards are a team effort,” said editor Tim Archuleta. “We are inspired by life in the Borderland, so it’s important that the El Paso Times continues its tradition of being recognized for excellence in Texas journalism.”

“I am grateful to our reporters, photojournalists and editors for doing a good job as we suffer with our community through the pandemic and difficult times in the news industry. We appreciate the support of our subscribers.

Statewide awards in the Class AAA division in 29 categories were announced May 1 at the annual Texas Associated Press and Managing Editors convention in Irving.

Haitian migrants cross the Rio Grande on their way to Del Rio, Texas from Ciudad Acuña on September 18, 2021. Thousands of migrants arrived in the border town and camped under the Del Rio International Bridge on the U.S. side of the frontier.

The Times won first place for Photojournalism, Video and Specialized Reporting. The runner-up awards were in the important categories of Freedom of Information and Featured Investigative Reporting for its coverage of shelters for young migrants.

The judges acknowledged the staff’s coverage of the Haitian border crisis, a story the Times spent much of 2021 covering after our reporting showed Haitian migrants moving to El Paso and Texas to seek relief. ‘asylum.

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War in Ukraine has devastating effect on journalism, says RSF in Press Freedom Index publication https://knightbilham.com/war-in-ukraine-has-devastating-effect-on-journalism-says-rsf-in-press-freedom-index-publication/ Tue, 03 May 2022 05:51:23 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/war-in-ukraine-has-devastating-effect-on-journalism-says-rsf-in-press-freedom-index-publication/ More than 100 evacuees from a steel plant in the besieged Ukrainian city of Mariupol have arrived in Zaporizhzhya, the Mariupol city council announced, as Russian forces resumed their assault on the complex. Live briefing: Russia’s invasion of Ukraine RFE/RL Live briefing gives you all the major developments on the invasion of Russia, how kyiv […]]]>

More than 100 evacuees from a steel plant in the besieged Ukrainian city of Mariupol have arrived in Zaporizhzhya, the Mariupol city council announced, as Russian forces resumed their assault on the complex.

Live briefing: Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

RFE/RL Live briefing gives you all the major developments on the invasion of Russia, how kyiv is fighting back, the plight of civilians and the Western reaction. For all of RFE/RL’s coverage of the war, click here.

The council said in a statement that those who arrived in Zaporizhzhya — a town about 230 kilometers northwest of Mariupol — were receive after spending weeks in the bunkers of the sprawling Azovstal factory.

Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said 156 people had been evacuated. She said several hundred more people remained inside the factory and tens of thousands of women, children and the elderly remained in Mariupol.

“There are no medicines, water or communication services,” she said during a May 3 briefing, adding that authorities must rescue anyone who wanted to escape.

The United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross coordinated the evacuation of women, children and the elderly from the steel mills.

“We would have hoped that a lot more people could have joined the convoy and got out of hell. That’s why we have mixed feelings,” ICRC’s Pascal Hundt told reporters in a videoconference.

Osnat Lubrani, UN humanitarian coordinator for Ukraine, said 101 women, men, children and elderly people could finally leave the factory, and several dozen more joined the convoy in a town on the outskirts of Mariupol . Some evacuees decided not to stay with the convoy and headed to destinations other than Zaporizhzhya, Lubrani said.

A few women who arrived in Zaporizhzhya held up handmade placards calling on the Ukrainian authorities to evacuate the soldiers still entrenched in the factory as well as their trapped relatives and relatives.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he hopes continued coordination with Kyiv and Moscow will lead to more humanitarian pauses that will allow civilians to leave the fighting safely.

WATCH: Current Time reporter Borys Sachalko comes under fire as he accompanies a Red Cross team attempting to evacuate a village between Russian-occupied Kherson and Ukrainian-held Mikolayiv in southern Ukraine .

Despite calls for further evacuations, Russian troops began to storm the plant shortly after the release of the last group of people, the Ukrainian Strategic Communications Center under the National Security and Defense Council said in a May 3 statement.

According to the Vereshchuk, Russia deliberately resumed the assault after some civilians walked out.

“That was their plan: to let a few civilians go and then continue the bombardments. However, civilians remain there, there are people who did not have time to get out of the rubble because the blockades were so heavy that in two days they simply couldn’t physically lift them. We must continue the humanitarian operation, including Azovstal,” Vereshchuk said.

French President Emmanuel Macron has also urged that evacuations from the steelworks be allowed to continue.

Macron spoke by telephone with Russian President Vladimir Putin on May 3, calling on Russia to assume its responsibilities as a permanent member of the UN Security Council by ending its devastating aggression, according to a press release. ‘Elysium.

The storming of the factory comes days after Putin said he had canceled plans for such an operation. Putin instead said he wanted Russian forces to block the sprawling factory “so a fly couldn’t get through.”

Later on May 3, Russian strikes began targeting the western city of Lviv. The strikes took place just before 8:30 p.m. local time. It was not immediately clear what was being targeted.

Mayor Andriy Sadoviy wrote on social media that residents of the city should take shelter. The train service from Lviv has been suspended.

Sadoviy acknowledged in another message that the attacks had damaged power stations, knocking out electricity in some neighborhoods.

The governor of Donetsk region in eastern Ukraine said Russian troops shelled a coking plant in the town of Avdiyivka, killing at least 10 people and injuring 15 others.

“The Russians knew exactly where to aim – the workers had just finished their shift and were waiting for a bus at a bus stop to take them home,” Pavlo Kyrylenko wrote in a Telegram post. “Another cynical crime of the Russians on our land.”

Kyrylenko said 11 other people were killed in the bombardment of four towns in the region. The number includes five killed in the town of Lyman and four in Vuhledar.

Kyrylenko said the death toll on May 3 was the highest in a single day since a Russian strike on a railway station in the city of Kramatorsk killed 57 people on April 8 and injured 109 others.

WATCH: Ukrainian troops southeast of Kharkiv examine heavy damage to a community cultural center, reflecting the impact on residents, now nearly gone.

Ukrainian officials said the Russian military also struck rail infrastructure across the country on May 3.

Oleksandr Kamyshin, head of Ukraine’s state-run railways, said Russian strikes hit six stations in the country’s central and western regions, inflicting heavy damage.

Dnipro region governor Valentyn Reznichenko said Russian missiles hit railway infrastructure in the area, injuring one person and disrupting train service.

Earlier on May 3, in a video address to the Kyiv parliament, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announcement 300 million pounds ($376 million) in additional military aid for Ukraine.

Britain has already sent military equipment, including missiles and missile launchers, to Ukraine. The new aid will consist of electronic warfare equipment, a battery-powered radar system, GPS jamming equipment and thousands of night vision devices.

In his speech, Johnson referenced a speech given in 1940 by World War II leader Winston Churchill as Britain faced aggression from Nazi Germany.

“The British people showed such unity and determination that we remember our time of greatest peril as our finest hour,” Johnson told the Verkhovna Rada. “This is Ukraine’s finest hour, an epic chapter in your national history that will be remembered and retold for generations to come.”

“We will continue to provide Ukraine … with weapons, funding and humanitarian aid, until we have achieved our long-term goal, which must be to fortify Ukraine so that no one ever dares to attack you again,” Johnson said. .

In Brussels, the EU executive indicated it was ready to propose another sanctions package to punish Moscow for invading Ukraine. But Slovakia and Hungary will not support sanctions against Russian energy, including oil imports.

Both countries say they are too dependent on Russian oil and there is no immediate alternative.

The sanctions will also target Russia’s largest bank, Sberbank, which will be barred from the SWIFT global banking reporting system, unnamed diplomats said.

Fighting also raged in the strategic port city of Odessa and across eastern Ukraine. A 15-year-old boy was killed in another Russian strike on Odessa, the city council said.

Ukraine’s second-largest city, Kharkiv, was being shelled, the army said May 3, while the General Staff said Ukrainian forces were defending the approach to Kharkiv from Izyum, some 120 kilometers away. At the South-East.

Since Russia launched its unprovoked war on February 24, its troops have failed to fully take control of any major Ukrainian city.

Diplomatically, Germany’s conservative opposition leader traveled to Kyiv on May 3 for meetings with Ukrainian officials, but Chancellor Olaf Scholz has made it clear that he will not be visiting Ukraine anytime soon. .

Friedrich Merz, who leads former Chancellor Angela Merkel’s center-right Union bloc, visited the town of Irpin, on the outskirts of kyiv, which was heavily shelled by Russian forces.

Scholz refused to travel to Ukraine due to kyiv’s refusal to invite the German head of state, President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, whom Ukrainians accuse of getting closer to Russia when he was foreign minister .

“It can’t work that a country that provides so much military aid, so much financial aid… then you say the president can’t come,” Scholz told public broadcaster ZDF on May 2.

The United States has warned that Moscow plans to formally take control of the eastern regions of Ukraine.

Michael Carpenter, the US ambassador to the OSCE, said Russia plans to imminently annex the territories of Lugansk and Donetsk in Ukraine’s eastern Donbass region, using referendums after failing to overthrow the Kyiv government.

Russia has encountered surprisingly stiff resistance in the north around the kyiv and Chernihiv regions, forcing it to redeploy its troops to the south and east, where fighting has intensified in recent days.

Eastern and southern Ukraine are considered key strategic objectives for Russia, allowing it a land link with Crimea.

Separately, Russian state news agency TASS on May 3 quoted the Defense Ministry as saying that more than a million people, including nearly 200,000 children, had been taken from Ukraine to Russia over the past two months.

Defense Ministry official Mikhail Mizintsev said that these civilians “had been evacuated to the territory of the Russian Federation from the dangerous regions” of Donetsk and Luhansk in eastern Ukraine, and from other parts passed under Russian control.

No details were provided on the location or circumstances of the moves.

With reporting from Reuters, AP, AFP, BBC and dpa
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Four major journalism prizes for Progress-Index reporters in 2021 competition https://knightbilham.com/four-major-journalism-prizes-for-progress-index-reporters-in-2021-competition/ Mon, 02 May 2022 01:32:34 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/four-major-journalism-prizes-for-progress-index-reporters-in-2021-competition/ The Progress-Index’s news team won four Virginia Press Association 1st Place Awards for Coverage in 2021. They also won two of three Investigative Journalism Awards. Staff won first place awards for Breaking News, Government Writing, General News Writing and Sports Column Writing; and received second and third place in In-Depth or Investigative Reports. “I’m proud […]]]>

The Progress-Index’s news team won four Virginia Press Association 1st Place Awards for Coverage in 2021. They also won two of three Investigative Journalism Awards.

Staff won first place awards for Breaking News, Government Writing, General News Writing and Sports Column Writing; and received second and third place in In-Depth or Investigative Reports.

“I’m proud of this team of reporters’ focus on reporting and writing meaningful stories for the community,” said Jeff Schwaner, a Gannett storytelling and monitoring coach who worked with staff in 2021.

Bill Atkinson received two first-place awards for his coverage of the closing of Old Towne Square in Petersburg and for opening a time capsule salvaged from the remains of the old Robert E. Lee Memorial on Monument Avenue in Richmond.

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Yamiche Alcindor and Kristen Welker talk about the return of the WHCD, mentorship and the importance of black journalists https://knightbilham.com/yamiche-alcindor-and-kristen-welker-talk-about-the-return-of-the-whcd-mentorship-and-the-importance-of-black-journalists/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 02:54:23 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/yamiche-alcindor-and-kristen-welker-talk-about-the-return-of-the-whcd-mentorship-and-the-importance-of-black-journalists/ After a two-year hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic, the White House Correspondents’ Association returns with the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. For the public, the WHCD is just a chance for journalists from major news outlets and the political talking heads they see on television to stand out – as much as a black-tie event […]]]>

After a two-year hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic, the White House Correspondents’ Association returns with the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. For the public, the WHCD is just a chance for journalists from major news outlets and the political talking heads they see on television to stand out – as much as a black-tie event can allow – with the country’s most beloved and least supportive politicians. Hosted by comedians like Cedric the Entertainer, Wanda Sykes, Larry Wilmore, the roasts are crowd favorites. However, the annual dinner has a more substantial purpose than that.

The WHCA honors distinguished print and broadcast journalists for excellence in comprehensive coverage of the White House and visual journalism covering the President. In the age of so-called “fake news,” celebrating these truth tellers is crucial to our democracy. Here, NBC News’ Yamiche Alcindor and Kristen Welker talk to ESSENCE about the significance of the return of one of DC’s most high-profile events, their respective careers, and the importance of black journalists in the media.

Yamiche Alcindor, 35, former reporter for The New York Times and the 2020 National Black Journalist Association Reporter of the Year is the newest member of NBC News’ Washington team. In the span of 12 years, the American-born Haitian has covered everything from the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, to the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, to the murder of Trayvon Martin, to the unrest in Ferguson after the murder of Mike Brown, to the demonstrations in Baltimore in response to the murder of Freddie Gray. She previously reported for USA Today and appeared as a contributor for NBC News and MSNBC. She is still the host of Washington Week on PBS.

Alcindor became a journalist because she heard Emmett Till’s name in a Kanye West song. After researching, she realized how civil rights journalists were so essential to the advancement of the civil rights movement.

“Fortunately, we had a vibrant black press that gave us all kinds of information. We had Jet Magazine posting the photo of Emmett Till,” the Georgetown and New York University alumni told ESSENCE.

Alcindor’s desire to become a journalist highlights the importance of the contribution of African Americans to the media and to American history. If not for the gruesome images of Till’s body at his open-air funeral, the brutal reality of the Jim Crow era would not only have stalled the civil rights movement, but would have completely erased it from history. It also emphasizes the disheartening reality of reporting on issues particularly affecting black Americans while existing in a black body.

Although painful, it is necessary.

For this, Alcindor explains how she finds balance: “I find joy and peace in one, recognizing the moments when I do not feel joyful and peaceful and giving myself the time and space to feel what I need to feel.”

She continues, “I’m a huge Oprah fan. And she says the most important thing you can give yourself is time. Journalists, of course, we’re all short on time. We’re all running around making a fuss, but I’ve learned, especially over the last two years, if I’m not feeling well, or just need some time to take a break, then I just do that. . And I understand it.

Fellow Kristen Welker supports the belief in giving oneself grace in the name of care and preservation. Welker says she draws support from her family by getting away from work and spending time with her husband and nine-month-old daughter. She even has her extended family.

“To me, my work crew at NBC is like family,” she told ESSENCE. “I am very lucky to be very close to my colleagues, my teammates. Peter Alexander is my co-chief White House correspondent, but also a dear friend and my co-anchor of Weekend Today. And we have a very unique relationship. And when covering these tough stories, we often look to each other for editorial advice and lean on each other.

Welker, 45, known for her work as co-host of Saturday TODAYThe weekend show, for serving as co-chief White House correspondent for NBC News and for hosting the final 2020 presidential debate, makes its own news, started her career as an intern for TODAY in 1997. Welker also leads the White House Women’s Team at NBC News.

Before joining forces on the same network, coincidentally, Welker and Alcindor both had newsworthy encounters with former President Donald Trump. In 2020, he questioned a direct quote from Trump regarding COVID-19 testing during a White House press briefing. Things soon turned sour. Dodging her questions and talking to her, he said to Alcindor, “Be nice. Don’t be threatening.

#WeLoveYamiche has been trending on Twitter for hours.

Alcindor recalls the interaction calling it “surreal”.

“It felt good to have people rallying around me, but I also think I was like, ‘Well, that’s the responsibility that you have, that these people want answers and they have to get them. “” she told ESSENCE. . “Overall, it confirmed for me that journalism needs to be a medium where you really try to hold the most powerful people accountable.”

Welker’s meeting came after the first presidential debate of 2020 between Trump and Biden, where she made history as the first black woman to moderate a solo presidential debate since 1992. In a now unavailable tweet, Trump l called it “terrible and unjust”.

Alcindor and Welker eagerly await the revival of the WHCD.

This year, guests can expect a new award at the ceremony. The WHCA has announced a lifetime achievement award to honor two pioneering black women journalists. The “Dunnigan-Payne Award” will be given to the families of the late White House reporters Alice Dunnigan and Ethel Payne. Dunnigan, a reporter for the Associated Negro Press, was the first African-American woman to receive White House credentials. Payne, a reporter for the Chicago Defender joined her a few years later and became known as the “first lady of the black press” and a reporter who asked the tough questions.

The 101-year-old tradition allows all generations of journalists to foster relationships with each other.

“I have a mentee that I met at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner,” Alcindor says. “The event is truly more than just a dinner party.”

Welker agrees, saying that while the dinner is glamorous and exciting, audiences miss the focus on mentoring and supporting the next generation of journalists. She participated in pre-dinner panels with young aspiring journalists. Although both champion mentorship, for Welker, one of his favorite parts of the night is the award presentations.

Since 1991, fellowships have been awarded to students and young journalists who represent the profession and highlight the importance of fighting for First Amendment freedoms. According to the WHCA, it has “awarded more than $1.5 million in scholarships and mobilized an additional $1.25 million in aid.” In 2021, University Scholarship winners attended 12 different universities and received a total of $105,900.

“Every year when we give scholarships to young, aspiring journalists, when the president attends, I think it shows our hearts,” Welker said. “For this position to be truly a symbol for other countries, we are here to promote journalism, to promote freedom of expression here in this country and in the world by supporting young journalists.”

TOPICS: Kristen Welker White House Correspondents Association White House Correspondents Dinner Yamiche Alcindor

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10 Nominees to Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame https://knightbilham.com/10-nominees-to-oklahoma-journalism-hall-of-fame/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:21:13 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/10-nominees-to-oklahoma-journalism-hall-of-fame/ Ted Streuli, left, is welcomed into the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame by Vance Harrison, president of the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, during ceremonies Thursday. Streuli was associate publisher and editor of The Journal Record from 2004 to 2018. (Photo by Kathryn McNutt) EDMOND — Ten journalists were recognized Thursday at the 52nd annual Oklahoma […]]]>

Ted Streuli, left, is welcomed into the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame by Vance Harrison, president of the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, during ceremonies Thursday. Streuli was associate publisher and editor of The Journal Record from 2004 to 2018. (Photo by Kathryn McNutt)

EDMOND — Ten journalists were recognized Thursday at the 52nd annual Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame induction ceremony at the University of Central Oklahoma.

Among those honored was Ted Streuli, former associate editor and editor of The logbook, who is now executive director of the nonprofit news organization Oklahoma Watch.

Other members of the initiation class of 2022 are Barbara Byrne Allen, a former journalist and educator from Oklahoma who is now director of academic programming for the Poynter Institute for Media Studies; Susan Cadot, vice president of production at the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority; J. Scott Cherry, retired food critic and wine columnist for the Tulsa World; and Richard Dowdell, longtime radio icon, educator and radio journalist in Tulsa.

Sam Jones, award-winning broadcast journalist and anchor from Tulsa; Ellen Knickmeyer, longtime correspondent in Washington and abroad; Steve Lackmeyer, author and journalist/columnist for Oklahoma; Bryan Painter, longtime journalist and writer in Enid and Oklahoma City; and Pat Riley Reeder, longtime Claremore editor and now public relations representative for the Will Rogers Memorial, were also among those honored.

“These individuals are lifelong journalists who have distinguished themselves in many ways both in their communities and outside of them,” said Joe Hight, director of the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame.

Former Oklahoma Attorney General Drew Edmondson was also recognized as the 2022 Lifetime Achievement Honoree for his tireless advocacy of freedom of information and First Amendment issues during his political career. . Edmondson served as Oklahoma’s attorney general from 1995 to 2011.

Founded in 1971, the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame today has 478 journalists and seven lifetime achievement honorees, including comedian and columnist Will Rogers, author Ralph Ellison and commentator and columnist Paul Harvey.

All members are featured on the hall of fame website okjournalismhalloffame.com.

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Sheriff Villanueva investigates reporter who exposed jail cover-up https://knightbilham.com/sheriff-villanueva-investigates-reporter-who-exposed-jail-cover-up/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 03:33:55 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/sheriff-villanueva-investigates-reporter-who-exposed-jail-cover-up/ Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva said on Tuesday his department was targeting a Times reporter in a criminal leak investigation for her reporting on a department cover-up, but after a barrage of criticism from politicians, of the newspaper and press freedom groups, he backed down. his announcement and denied that he considered the journalist […]]]>

Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva said on Tuesday his department was targeting a Times reporter in a criminal leak investigation for her reporting on a department cover-up, but after a barrage of criticism from politicians, of the newspaper and press freedom groups, he backed down. his announcement and denied that he considered the journalist a suspect.

The sheriff lashed out at Times writer Alene Tchekmedyian during an early morning press conference in which he suggested two longtime enemies leaked surveillance video to him showing a deputy kneeling on his head of a handcuffed inmate.

Detailing an ongoing criminal investigation into the leak, Villanueva posted a poster with large photographs of Chekmedyian, his political rival Eli Vera and Sheriff Inspector General Max Huntsman with arrows pointing from the two men towards the reporter.

“The three people we want to know a lot about,” Villanueva said. “These three people have important questions to answer.”

Villanueva presented a list of possible crimes under investigation, including conspiracy, burglary and unauthorized use of a database. When asked by reporters if he was investigating Chekmedyian specifically, the sheriff replied, “All parties to the act are under investigation.”

The comments were immediately condemned, with Times editor Kevin Merida saying in a statement: “His attempt to criminalize reporting goes against well-established constitutional law. We will vigorously defend the rights of Chekmedyian and the Los Angeles Times in any proceedings or investigation by authorities.

Supervisor Hilda Solis, who along with other supervisors has repeatedly clashed with the sheriff, followed up hours later by pledging to ask California Atty. General Rob Bonta to “investigate his pattern of impermissible and dangerous actions like the one today”.

“Unfortunately, Sheriff Villanueva has a habit of attacking, slandering and threatening those who monitor or report his misconduct,” Solis said in a statement.

At 6:46 p.m., Villanueva released a statement reacting to what he called an “incredible frenzy of spread disinformation.”

“I must clarify that at no time today did I say that an LA Times reporter was a suspect in a criminal investigation,” he said. “We have no interest in pursuing, and we do not pursue, criminal charges against journalists.”

The Times published a report last month outlining how sheriff’s department officials worked to cover up the March 2021 incident because they feared it would portray the department in a “negative light.” The Times report was accompanied by surveillance video from a San Fernando courthouse detention area that captured the deputy kneeling on the inmate’s head for three minutes after handcuffing him.

Earlier this week, the newspaper and other outlets reported on a lawsuit in which a department commander alleged that Villanueva had participated in the cover-up, telling underlings, “We don’t need bad media right now”.

Villanueva denied involvement in the cover-up, saying he learned of the violent detention eight months after it happened and immediately launched an investigation into it.

The sheriff had also announced that he had launched a criminal investigation into how the Times obtained the video of the detention, but declined to give details. Then on Tuesday, following news reports of the commander’s claims, Villanueva summoned the media to the downtown courthouse for an update on the ongoing criminal investigation.

“These are stolen goods that were illegally removed from people who had intent – criminal intent – and that will be investigated,” Villanueva said.

Chekmedyian was present at the press conference as the sheriff repeatedly gestured towards her photo with a pointer. When she attempted to ask a question, he snapped, “We’re not going to answer you.”

Vera, a former high-ranking department official who is running to overthrow Villanueva, has publicly said the sheriff was involved in the cover-up and viewed the video at an aide’s office days after it happened.

And Huntsman announced he was investigating allegations that Villanueva lied about his knowledge of the incident and issued a subpoena ordering Villanueva to testify or turn over records.

David Loy, legal director of the nonprofit First Amendment Coalition, said Chekmedyian’s reporting was “a matter of public concern on which the press has the absolute right, indeed the duty, to report.”

The Western Media Guild said in a statement: “We condemn these outrageous attacks on newsgathering, and we remain committed to supporting journalism that reports the facts without fear or favour.”

Villanueva called the video stolen property, but Loy said if the reporter received a copy of the video and reported it, that would be “exactly what the 1st Amendment gives the press the right to do.”

“I am flabbergasted on some level because what the Sheriff is doing reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of the basic 1st Amendment law. This has been settled for decades,” Loy said.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that journalists generally cannot be held liable for the publication of leaked documents on matters of public interest, even if the journalist knew or should have known that they were obtained by illegal means.

Several sheriff’s deputies sued The Times in 2013 to stop publication of an article about the department’s hiring of 280 employees with histories of gross misconduct. MPs then argued that a Times reporter had committed a crime by possessing internal personnel files. An appeals court dismissed their complaint and the newspaper published the story.

In a letter to Villanueva, Jeff Glasser, general counsel for The Times, said any attempt or threat to sue Chekmedyian “is an abuse of your official position that risks exposing you and the county to legal liability.”

Glasser said that under the State Journalists’ Shield Act, Chekmedyian could not be compelled to reveal his sources and that investigators had no right to obtain search warrants targeting Chekmedyian.

“You are warned that if the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department attempts to search the property or data of Ms. Chekmedyian or any other LA Times employee in this matter, the department will have directly violated [state law] and clearly established constitutional law, and the LA Times will seek all available remedies against you, the Department, and every official implicated in such unlawful conduct,” Glasser wrote.

Villanueva said he respects the work of the media, but has made a habit of attacking some of the journalists who cover him. In 2020, KPCC reporter Josie Huang was knocked to the ground by two Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies and arrested. In the days following the incident, Villanueva told The Associated Press that Huang had “crossed the line from journalism to activism” and defended the actions of his deputies. The case against Huang was later dropped.

The broadsides have increased as he seeks a second term. After Times columnist Gustavo Arellano mocked his decision last fall to let MPs wear cowboy hats, Villanueva called it a “vendido” — a sold-out sale — on his weekly livestream on Facebook. This spring, he used the same forum to lash out at the paper’s Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Robert Greene after a meeting in which Villanueva made the bizarre accusation that Huntsman was a Holocaust denier. Holocaust.

Chekmedyian, who covered for the sheriff’s department for most of Villanueva’s tenure, was a frequent target of her wrath.

Villanueva has for months refused to speak with Tchekmedyian, ignoring her frequent interview requests and the questions she submits for her weekly Facebook shows.

She and other Times reporters doggedly covered the sheriff and the department, including stories about the sheriff’s efforts to rehire former deputies with checkered pasts, Villanueva’s involvement in the effort to cover up the fact that deputies had shared photos from the scene of Kobe Bryant’s helicopter crash. , and a secret unit the sheriff formed to investigate his political enemies and critics.

As she reported the story of the secret unit, a department spokesperson told The Times that sheriff’s officials would not discuss the matter with Chekmedyian, saying she had a conflict of interest. The spokesperson repeatedly declined to provide details of the alleged dispute to a Times editor. The department suggested it would take questions from “any other” Times reporters.

The Times declined to assign a new reporter to the story.

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