Photographers annual wage – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:54:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://knightbilham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-02T220243.831.png Photographers annual wage – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ 32 32 The Salt Lake Tribune wins top honors in the Society of Professional Journalists’ Utah competition https://knightbilham.com/the-salt-lake-tribune-wins-top-honors-in-the-society-of-professional-journalists-utah-competition/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 13:04:20 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/the-salt-lake-tribune-wins-top-honors-in-the-society-of-professional-journalists-utah-competition/ Tribune is named the best information-oriented website, one of the top 16 honors. (Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Salt Lake Tribune building in Salt Lake City, Tuesday, June 21, 2022. Tribune reporters, photographers and editors received 16 top awards at the Utah Chapter Annual Meeting Headliners of the Society for Professional Journalists […]]]>

Tribune is named the best information-oriented website, one of the top 16 honors.

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Salt Lake Tribune building in Salt Lake City, Tuesday, June 21, 2022. Tribune reporters, photographers and editors received 16 top awards at the Utah Chapter Annual Meeting Headliners of the Society for Professional Journalists competition, announced June 16, 2022.

The Salt Lake Tribune’s reporting, editing and photography have been honored by the Utah Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

The Tribune received 16 first place prizes in the annual SPJ Chapter competition at an awards banquet held Thursday night at the Gallivan Center. The Tribune also received eight second-place awards, nine third-place honors and five honorable mentions.

Among the highlights of The Tribune:

• The Tribune was honored as Utah’s top news-focused website.

• Political journalist Bryan Schott was named the state’s top journalist.

• Tribune photographer Trent Nelson has been honored as Utah’s top news photographer.

Family members at a vigil at the State Capitol in Salt Lake City for Staff Sgt. Taylor Hoover on Sunday, August 29, 2021. Hoover was killed in a suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan. The photo was among those that won Salt Lake Tribune photographer Trent Nelson the “Best Photographer” award in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Utah Headliners Chapter competition, the results of which were announced June 16. 2022.

• The Tribune’s coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic received top honors. The staff of The Tribune received a top prize for their continued coverage of COVID-19, while The Tribune writers swept the podium in the COVID-19 investigative category – taking first, second, third and honorable mention.

• In individual newscasts, The Tribune reporters received first place awards for coverage of education, environment, arts and entertainment, criminal justice, government and journalism of solutions.

• Tribune reporters also received first place for their continuous coverage (of rural homelessness) and general reporting (for coverage of the deaths of Paiute children at a state-run boarding school).

Here are the awards received by The Tribune in this year’s annual competition. (For a complete list of winners from all media, including radio and television, go to the SPJ Utah Chapter website, UtahSPJ.com.)

News-oriented site

• First place: The Salt Lake Tribune team.

Journalist

• First place: Bryan Schott.

Photographer

• First place: Trent Nelson.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Edgar Gago, a man living on the streets of Provo, portrayed a portrait on Sunday, May 16, 2021. The photo was among those that won Salt Lake Tribune photographer Trent Nelson the award. for “Best Photographer” in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Utah Headliners Chapter competition, the results of which were announced June 16, 2022.

Arts and entertainment report

• First place: Sean P. Means, “Ballet alumni described body shaming, prejudice and bullying. University of Utah faculty are committed to further reform.

Business/consumer relationships

• Third place: Kolbie Peterson, “Enter the world of Goodwill Outlet dumpsters, where some Utahns fuel the ultimate stampede.”

Continuous coverage

• First place: Taylor Stevens, Bethany Rodgers, Trent Nelson, “Rural Homelessness in Utah”.

• Honorable Mention: Tony Semerad, “Wealth in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints”.

Continuous COVID-19 coverage

• First place: The Salt Lake Tribune team.

COVID-19 Survey Coverage

• First Place: Bethany Rodgers, Taylor Stevens and Erin Alberty, “Utah’s leaders went rogue in the early coronavirus response.”

• Second Place: Erin Alberty, “Utahans Missed Millions in Coronavirus Relief.”

• Third place: Jessica Miller, shared with Nate Carlisle, FOX 13, “Here are the men who died of COVID-19 in Utah prisons.”

• Honorable Mention: Erin Alberty, “Utah kids aren’t told about exposure to COVID-19 until it’s almost too late to self-quarantine.”

Criminal justice reports

• First Place: Connor Sanders, “In the Shadow of Utah’s National Parks, Police Juggle High Call Volumes.”

• Third Place: Matthew D. LaPlante, “With the Talking Ban, Utah Police and others may have lost a window into planned protests.”

Diversity and Equity Reports

• Third Place: Becky Jacobs, “How the Other Half Eats”.

Education reports

• First Place: Courtney Tanner, “Earthquake Hazards in Utah Schools”.

• Third Place: Courtney Tanner, “Ratings are starting to pick up in Salt Lake City, but don’t expect pre-pandemic scores.”

Environmental reports

• First Place: Zak Podmore, Francisco Kjolseth, “As Lake Powell Shrinks, The Colorado River Comes To Life.”

Feature page design

• Second place: Rudy Mesicek, cover of The Mix, June 6, 2021.

• Third place: Rudy Mesicek: cover of The Mix, January 17, 2021.

General feature reports

• First Place: Courtney Tanner and Alastair Lee Bitsóí, “Bodies of Paiute Children Reportedly Buried at the Site of the Former Utah Indian Boarding School.”

• Second Place: Courtney Tanner, “’Mr. Lewis, your wife woke up.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) The city won’t allow homeless people to sleep in tents, so a woman covers herself with a blanket under an overpass, trying to stay out of the snow, Tuesday, Dec. 28 2021. The photo won Tribune photographer Rick Egan first place in the “general news photo” category in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Utah Headliners Chapter competition, the results of which were announced June 16, 2022.

General News Photo

• First Place: Rick Egan, “No Tents Allowed”.

• Third place: Trent Nelson, “Fallen Marine”.

General news report

• Runner Up: Leia Larsen, “$500,000 of federal coronavirus money used to build tubing hill in Uintah County, Utah.”

• Honorable Mention: Leia Larsen, “How a Habitat for Humanity Building Plan Gone Wrong”.

Government reports

• First Place: Leia Larsen, “Republican Women Say They Lived in Toxic Environment in Salt Lake County GOP.”

• Second place: Matt Canham, “What is ‘the Utah way’?”

• Honorable Mention: Bryan Schott, “Utah Group Goes Door-to-Door Searching for Voter Fraud”.

Multimedia

• First place: Francisco Kjolseth and Zak Podmore, “Shrinking Lake Powell”.

personality profile

• Honorable Mention: Peggy Fletcher Stack, “This ‘Jeopardy!’ King likes atlases, Legos, long novels and anecdotes, but who is the real Ken Jennings? »

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Two wild horses from the Onaqui wild horse herd train and fight, after the first day of wild horse removal from Utah’s Onaqui Mountains near Dugway, Wednesday, the 14th July 2021. The photo was part of a package that won Salt Lake Tribune photographer Rick Egan first place for “photo essay” in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Utah Headliners Chapter competition, the results of which have been announced June 16, 2022.

Photo documentary

• Third place: Rick Egan, “Onaqui Horses”.

Podcast

• Second Place: David Noyce, Peggy Fletcher Stack, Christopher Samuels, “‘Mormon Land’: Following the Capitol Siege, a Conversation with Retired Senate Leader Harry Reid.”

• Third Place: Xoel Cardenas, Andy Larsen and Eric Walden, “How ‘Bout This Jazz, Ep. 11: Can the Utah Jazz Backcourt Step Up Their Defense?

Solutions Journalism

• First Place: Luke Peterson, “How a Utah Vertical Farm is Fighting Climate Change.”

• Second Place: Saige Miller and Becky Jacobs, “Closing Utah’s Wage Gap”.

News photo spot

• First place: Rick Egan, “Parleys Fire”.

Use of news-oriented social media

• Second place: The Salt Lake Tribune team, The Salt Lake Tribune on Twitter.

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Aim for the stars: explore everything from astrotourism to holistic astronomy experiences https://knightbilham.com/aim-for-the-stars-explore-everything-from-astrotourism-to-holistic-astronomy-experiences/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/aim-for-the-stars-explore-everything-from-astrotourism-to-holistic-astronomy-experiences/ For Neeraj Ladia, “astronomy” or staring into space has been the biggest mystery for humans. “You are amazed to see the movements in the sky, fantasizing about the magical shimmering existence. Astro watching led me to a different learning in life. You realize how small a person is in the universe,” says the Chennai-based astronomer […]]]>

For Neeraj Ladia, “astronomy” or staring into space has been the biggest mystery for humans. “You are amazed to see the movements in the sky, fantasizing about the magical shimmering existence. Astro watching led me to a different learning in life. You realize how small a person is in the universe,” says the Chennai-based astronomer and astrophotographer, who is also the CEO of Space Arcade, a multi-channel brand for stargazers and outdoor enthusiasts specializing in telescopes. and the twins.

Although Ladia’s expertise lies in astrophotography, he is a mechanical engineer by training and an astronomer at heart. “I love visiting new and quiet places while capturing the night sky in my mind and my camera forever,” he says, explaining how the next six months are filled with celestial activity – eclipses, meteor showers.

It begins with a Perseid meteor shower around August 9-13, followed by a Draconid meteor shower between October 6-10, as well as a partial solar eclipse which will occur on October 25, visible above Europe, western Asia and northeastern Africa.

Massive sky-related activities, terrestrial spaces and starry sky sites determined at the specific time of the year have given impetus to “astrotourism”, which is no longer just a passion for a few astronomy enthusiasts. , but has become a great concept to promote tourism. destinations and experience eclipses, meteor showers and other celestial events. “Events like these add to your travel itinerary. As places become more accessible, there is interest in traveling to remote areas or exploring new places, and stargazing activities can add value to their trip, in conjunction with the planned itinerary,” explains Ladia.

Over the past few years, India has opened up to the potential of fostering astrotourism in places like Rajasthan, Leh, Ladakh, and the hills of northern and southern India. But that kind of adventure is extremely niche, says Paul Savio, CEO and co-founder of Starscapes, a platform that offers a holistic astronomical experience. He cites reasons such as lack of awareness among Indians.

“There is already a growing adoption of astronomy experiences and a latent interest in the subject. We have reached out to people looking for new experiences, and not just those looking for astronomy experiences. helps introduce many people to this field. The goal is to reach the casual astronomy enthusiasts who are interested in the field,” says Savio, who joined Starscapes when it started as an observatory in Kausani, Uttarakhand in 2015 by amateur astronomer Ramashish Ray, the founder of Starscapes.

“It is essential to be present in places away from major cities with places that have fairly dark skies, measuring 4 or less on the Bortle scale (a measure of the darkness of the night sky, 1 being places extremely remote and 9 being city centers) Locations are also important tourist sites, as new experiences are sought after and better appreciated by tourists,” adds Savio.

It all started with just a telescope set up at Kausani’s cottage which allowed guests to explore the night sky. This was followed by the establishment of a small observatory with paid shows. “People who visited us weren’t looking for astronomy experiences, they were looking for something new. And this idea led us to create a platform to bring astronomy experiences to everyone in 2017,” Savio adds.

Sky is the limit

Apart from the positive effects of the pandemic which brought access to clear skies when most people were confined to their homes, the night sky today offers a good opportunity to learn about stars, constellations, planets and meteor showers.

In 2009, the first eclipse passenger flight in India was organized to observe the total solar eclipse in Taregna, a village in Bihar located 35 km from Patna and which literally translates as “counting the stars”. The place is best known for the astronomer Aryabhatta, who set up camp there to study the stars. Travel agency Cox & Kings had arranged a flight for stargazers and others to observe this rare total solar eclipse.

Apart from experiential tourism, star gazing is popular in Rajasthan, Ladakh and Pondicherry. The administration of Ladakh, in association with the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, plans to promote astrotourism in the village of Hanle in the coming months. The State Department of Art and Culture of Rajasthan in Jaipur has launched a ‘night sky tourism’ project to encourage tourists to see the night sky through the telescopes installed at Amber Fort, Jawahar Kala Kendra and Jantar Mantar.

The Bikaner House in New Delhi has also been chosen as a hub for astrotourism and a telescope will soon be installed for tourists to observe the sky. Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot has announced the installation of telescopes in 33 districts to promote science environment. “In addition to this, Sambhar Festival in Sambhar, a less explored destination, promotes astrotourism and night tourism through the beautiful long plots where you have no habitation and you can see the night sky with stars and the Milky Way very clearly,” says Gayatri Rathore, Principal Secretary for Tourism, Rajasthan, in an interview with FinancialExpress.com.

Starscapes worked in dark sky locations for a mobile observatory in Pondicherry on Club Mahindra property for a holistic astronomy experience. The company has also partnered with the Uttarakhand Tourism Board to develop Benital as India’s first astro village.

“Initiatives like these are slowly becoming a priority for many other state governments. We organize astrophotography sessions, a planetary parade and the “Messier Marathon” in our observatories in Kausani, Bhimtal and our mobile observatories in Virajpet, Madikeri, Goa and Munnar. The plan is to open observatories in 28 cities across India over the next three years and roll out products such as tours and parties in partnership with tour operators, resorts and hotels to reach as many customers as possible,” says Savio, who uses Celestron 8-inch GoTo motorized auto telescopes and 8-inch Dobsonian telescopes for shows around observatories to observe planets up to Neptune, surface features from planets to Saturn, including clouds on Jupiter, mountains on Mars, and Saturn’s rings.

Space Arcade’s Ladia shares an example of a stargazing trip to the less populated hills of Yelagiri in India’s southeastern state of Tamil Nadu, a prime dark spot away from the city to stargaze a darker sky conducive to stargazing. “In 2020, we have organized sessions for astro-photographers and families for short trips in addition to places like the Sariska Forest Reserves in the north and the hills of Kodaikanal and Jawadhu in the south as astronomy getaways” says Ladia, who is also associated with Astroport, a themed resort and activity center in India and South Asia that offers astronomy and terrestrial space experiences.

Currently, Astroport runs camps in the Sariska Tiger Reserve in Alwar district of Rajasthan, where amateur astronomers have access to all the necessary equipment for astronomical research like telescopes, star charts and cameras as well as an observatory. They welcome school groups for educational programs and other activities. The company will expand to 20 such theme sites in the future.

Meanwhile, Science City, Kapurthala also takes students and adult tours to observe celestial bodies like the moon, Saturn, and Jupiter. Apart from hosting various astronomical events at Jantar Mantar Observatory and Pir Ghaib Observatory in the nation’s capital, Nehru Planetarium in Delhi organizes multiple shows and workshops for a clear view of the night sky. Space is a tribute to the first Indian Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, to promote his ideas on the importance of science and astronomy teaching methods for children.

Last year, the Ministry of Tourism, as part of the Dekho Apna Desh campaign, organized a webinar titled “Astro-Tourism: The Next Frontier of Nature-Based Tourism”. The objective was to promote nature-based tourism and the evolution of astrotourism as one of the most authentic and environmentally friendly means of travel, as well as its immense potential to bring benefits social, economic and conservation to remote communities.

Rupinder Brar, additional director general of the Ministry of Tourism, said astrotourism is a new phenomenon taking hold around the world. Capturing people’s inherent interest in the mysterious provides the driving force for tourism throughout the ages, India has immense potential when it comes to nature-based tourism having all the physical geographical features of the world. The plan is to improve domestic travel and such experiences can promote visits to lesser-known destinations surrounded by nature.

While addressing potential, the goal of astrotourism is to foster sustainable and responsible tourism that puts communities at the heart and center of tourism. The idea can train local women in the high altitude Himalayan desert of Ladakh, generating significant annual income for local communities.

ASTRO GAZING: QUICK FACTS

The Perseid meteor is commonly sought after by stargazers and stargazers because it is often possible to see 60 to 100 meteors in an hour from a dark location during its peak.

Several factors affect stargazing. Cloud cover is the most common deterrent. Conditions such as transparency, referring to the clarity of the sky, affect the ability to see the night sky. The stability of the atmosphere plays an important role in stargazing

Move away from city lights and turn off nearby lights, inside and out. Try getting up high to get a clearer view of the horizon. Generally, the sky is at its best during clear, crisp winter nights and at its worst during humid, warm summer evenings. The best views are when the moon is in its crescent or gibbous phase; so as not to pollute the sky with light

Kutch white salt marsh in Gujarat is best for stargazers as there is no interference from light and pollution from vehicles

WHERE TO DO ASTRO GAZING

— Lake Sambhar, about 100 km from Jaipur
—Shahapur, Maharashtra
— Neil Island, Andaman and Nicobar Islands
— Nubra Valley, Jammu and Kashmir
— Coorg, Karnataka
— Yumthang Valley,
—Sikkim
— Taregna, Bihar
—Jaisalmer, Rajasthan
— Kutch, Gujarat

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Allee Wallace faithfully captures San Antonio’s black history https://knightbilham.com/allee-wallace-faithfully-captures-san-antonios-black-history/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/allee-wallace-faithfully-captures-san-antonios-black-history/ San Antonio photographer Allee Wallace is 87 years old and crammed with decades of Texas history that won’t be taken away. In his personal story, Wallace overcame challenges, going from picking cotton for $2.50 a day to becoming a college graduate and instructor, then serving in the military, then diligently documenting San Antonio’s black community. […]]]>



San Antonio photographer Allee Wallace is 87 years old and crammed with decades of Texas history that won’t be taken away.

In his personal story, Wallace overcame challenges, going from picking cotton for $2.50 a day to becoming a college graduate and instructor, then serving in the military, then diligently documenting San Antonio’s black community. .

His most recent challenge came with the coronavirus pandemic. Wallace and his wife, Doris, were among the first San Anton residents to be infected with COVID-19 in March 2020. As the San Antonio Observer reports, Wallace survived a month in intensive care. His wife, Leola Doris Wallace, died on March 21, 2020, at the age of 83.

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How much does a professional photographer earn in the United States? https://knightbilham.com/how-much-does-a-professional-photographer-earn-in-the-united-states/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 02:38:33 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/how-much-does-a-professional-photographer-earn-in-the-united-states/ The average salary for a professional photographer can range between $29,000 (25th percentile) and $40,000 (75th percentile), with the highest earners (90th percentile) earning $55,000 per year in the United States, according to ZipRecruiter. Do professional photographers make a lot of money? According to the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, photographers earn on average between […]]]>

The average salary for a professional photographer can range between $29,000 (25th percentile) and $40,000 (75th percentile), with the highest earners (90th percentile) earning $55,000 per year in the United States, according to ZipRecruiter.

Do professional photographers make a lot of money?

According to the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, photographers earn on average between $30,000 and $40,000 a year, with the top 10% earning over $70,000.

What is the highest paid job as a photographer?

  • freelance photographer.
  • Fashion photographer.
  • Art photographer.
  • Medical photographer.
  • Product photographer.
  • Film set photographer.
  • White House photographer.
  • Wedding photographer.
  • How much does a wedding photographer earn in the United States?

    According to Payscale, the average annual salary for a wedding photographer in the United States is $44,042. According to Glassdoor, the average annual salary in the United States is $35,726.

    What is the monthly income of a photographer?

    The annual salary of a indian photographer varies between 0.2 lakh and 1.7 lakh. A minimum of one year of experience is required to work as a photographer. What is the highest salary for a photographer in India? A photographer can earn up to *6.6 Lakhs per year (about $56,000 per month).

    What is the highest salary for a photographer?

    The majority of photographers salaries currently range between $26,000 (25th percentile) and $50,000 (75th percentile), with the highest earners (90th percentile) earning $77,000 per year in the United States, according to ZipRecruiter.%27

    How do professional photographers make money?

  • Photograph small businesses.
  • Teach photography.
  • You can sell your work in digital or printed format.
  • You can use your photos for stock photography.
  • Write a photo blog.
  • Invest in your art.
  • Take photos as part of your photography tour or take part in a photography workshop.
  • Become a social guru.
  • Can you be rich by being a photographer?

    It’s very unlikely that you’ll ever be rich if you’re into photography. When you have only one source of income, like your only job, it will be difficult for you to live and you will have to make sacrifices. You don’t have to give up the effort or the result.

    What kind of photographers earn the most money?

  • A photographer’s stylist can help create outfits and makeup for models, as well as compositing images.
  • Commercial photography.
  • Fashion photography.
  • Photo editor.
  • Wedding photography.
  • Photojournalist.
  • Photographer assistant.
  • Portrait photography.
  • How much do successful photographers earn?

    Can photography make you rich?

    Full-time photographers can expect to earn between $30,000 and $75,000 per year, with some earning more. Many photographers prefer to work part-time in photography in order to learn more about how it will financially support their career.

    Which career is best for photography?

  • Portrait photographer.
  • Travel photographer.
  • Stock photographer.
  • Photojournalist.
  • Sports photographer.
  • Wildlife photographer.
  • Fashion photographer.
  • Scientific photographer.
  • Which jobs pay a million a year?

  • Professional athlete.
  • Investment banker.
  • Entrepreneur.
  • Accountant.
  • Insurance agent.
  • Real estate agent.
  • How Much Do New York Wedding Photographers Earn?

    On ZipRecruiter, salaries for wedding photographers currently range between $100,911 (25th percentile) and $136,559 (75th percentile), with the highest earners (90th percentile) earning $142,592 per year in New York City.

    Is wedding photography profitable?

    If you work as a wedding photographer, you’ll typically spend $27,730 a year on business expenses.

    How much do most wedding photographers make?

    According to Payscale, a average wedding photographer earns between $40,000 and $60,000 a year. Generalist photographers earn less than $35,000 per year, which is significantly lower than the annual salary of a commercial photographer. Wedding photographers earn an average of more than $62,000 a year, according to a 2010 survey.

    How much is a photographer paid in the United States?

    In the United States, the annual salary of a photographer is $42,770, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    What is the salary of a photographer?

    In 2015, the median annual salary for a photographer was $31,710.

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    Launching Pascal Hall’s Free Summer Author Series with Laura Miller, July 27 https://knightbilham.com/launching-pascal-halls-free-summer-author-series-with-laura-miller-july-27/ Mon, 30 May 2022 23:47:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/launching-pascal-halls-free-summer-author-series-with-laura-miller-july-27/ ROCKPORT — Pascal Hall, in partnership with the Authors Guild Foundation and Maine Media Workshops + College, is launching a free summer author series featuring live in-depth discussions with award-winning writers. The series kicks off at Pascal Hall on Wednesday, July 27 at 5 p.m. with novelist Lauren Groff in conversation with Slateis Laura Miller. […]]]>

    ROCKPORT — Pascal Hall, in partnership with the Authors Guild Foundation and Maine Media Workshops + College, is launching a free summer author series featuring live in-depth discussions with award-winning writers.

    The series kicks off at Pascal Hall on Wednesday, July 27 at 5 p.m. with novelist Lauren Groff in conversation with Slateis Laura Miller. It will continue on Tuesday, August 2, at 5 p.m., with American historian Ted Widmer in conversation with biographer Patricia O’Toole. At each event, the public will have the opportunity to ask questions. A reception and autograph session follow each event at 6 p.m. The events are free, but the number of places is limited, so it is necessary to register to attend. https://app.donorview.com/g8lbY

    “We thought it would be great to host a Summer Author Series here in Rockport for locals and visitors interested in learning about some of today’s top novelists and non-fiction authors. “said Linda Lesher, owner of Pascal Hall and Barnswallow Books, in a press release.

    The Lesher family is dedicated to giving authors a platform for their work. Their Barn Talk events at Barnswallow Books have featured books on everything from hiking to baseball stadiums, local artists and photographers to the 10th edition of Dr. Spock’s Baby & Child Care. Through this new partnership with Maine Media Workshops + College and the Authors Guild Foundation, the family looks forward to continuing the tradition at Pascal Hall.

    Lauren Groff is the author of six fiction books, the most recent being the novel, Matrix (September 2021). Her work has won the Story Prize, the ABA Indies’ Choice Award and the Grand Prix de l’Héroïne de France. She has been a three-time finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction, twice for the Kirkus Prize, and shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Prize, Southern Book Prize, and Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and was named one of Grantais the best of young American novelists. His work has been translated into over 30 languages. A resident of Gainesville, Florida, Groff serves on the Board of the Authors Guild.

    Laura Miller, book and culture columnist at Slate, and co-founder of Salon.com, will guide the conversation. Miller’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’sthe Guardianthe Los Angeles Timesthe the wall street journal and many other publications, including the New York Times book reviewwhere she wrote the Last Word column for two years.

    Ted Wimer, a 2022 Guggenheim Fellow and author of Lincoln on the Edge: Thirteen Days in Washington. Widmer is a historian, writer, librarian, and musician who previously served as President Clinton’s speechwriter. First director of the CV Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College, he established the George Washington Book Prize, an annual award given to the best book on the Founding Fathers. In 2006, he served as director and librarian of the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, where he led efforts to digitize library holdings and raised funds to save Haitian libraries in the wake of the earthquake. earth of 2010. Widmer later served as senior adviser to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and spent five years helping to create “Disunion”, a digital history of the Civil War produced by the New York Times. Currently, Widmer is director of the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress and professor of humanities at CUNY Macaulay Honors College in New York.

    Patricia O’Toole is the author of two biographies, When the trumpets soundabout Theodore Roosevelt, and The five of heartsexamining the life of Henry Adams. The Five of Hearts was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. A former professor at the School of the Arts at Columbia University, she is a member of the Society of American Historians and a member of the Presidential Historical Commission of the New York Historical Society.

    For more information contact Lynn Boulger at 207-669-2566 or lboulger@authorsguildfoundation.org

    About Maine Media

    Founded in 1973 as a summer school for photographers, Maine Media Workshops + College is a nonprofit institution offering certificate programs, workshops, and masterclasses in photography, film, media arts, printmaking, book arts and creative writing. Maine Media Workshops + College welcomes domestic and international students from its 20-acre campus in Rockport, Maine. Maine Media’s Writers Harbor is an innovative branch of the workshop, designed to inspire and teach motivated writers to learn more about the craft of writing. The Writers Harbor seeks to create a community of writers who are dedicated to developing their own work in the genres of poetry, non-fiction, fiction and screenwriting.

    About the Authors Guild and the Authors Guild Foundation
    With more than 12,000 members, the Authors Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest professional organization for published writers. He advocates on behalf of working writers to protect free speech, freedom of expression and the copyrights of authors; fights for fair contracts and the ability of authors to earn a living wage; and provides a welcoming community for writers and translators of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and journalism. Through its educational and charitable arm, the Authors Guild Foundation, it also provides free programming to teach working writers about the craft of writing, as well as hosting public events that highlight the importance of writing. a rich and diverse American literary culture and the authors who contribute to it. to that.

    About Pascal Hall
    The owners of Pascal Hall are committed to creating intellectually stimulating and inclusive cultural events. Book lovers, they also own the Barnswallow bookstore, which is a stone’s throw from the Halle. Once a church, then an art gallery, the historic building has brought the community together for decades. The new owner plans to continue this tradition.

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    Proximity of fans and team benches to NBA courts is an issue | Opinion https://knightbilham.com/proximity-of-fans-and-team-benches-to-nba-courts-is-an-issue-opinion/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/proximity-of-fans-and-team-benches-to-nba-courts-is-an-issue-opinion/ The Dallas Mavericks were fined $100,000 on Sunday for violating team bench rules in a playoff game. When the league fines a player or team, a press release regarding the fine is sent to NBA reporters. But this was the third league office email I’ve received in the last three weeks referencing the Mavericks. “The […]]]>

    The Dallas Mavericks were fined $100,000 on Sunday for violating team bench rules in a playoff game. When the league fines a player or team, a press release regarding the fine is sent to NBA reporters. But this was the third league office email I’ve received in the last three weeks referencing the Mavericks.

    “The Dallas Mavericks organization has been fined $100,000 for continuing to violate league rules regarding team bench decorum,” the statement said. “On several occasions, several players and a member of the coaching staff stood for an extended period of time in the area of ​​the Mavericks team bench, stood off the team bench, and were on the field of play or encroached upon it during the game.”

    The Mavericks were fined $25,000 on May 6 for the same infraction, then fined $50,000 on May 18 for the same.

    I was a bit surprised that the league enforced a rule regarding bench decorum because it’s something that happens throughout the regular season, every year, without penalty.

    On December 8, 2021, I actually brought this up in a postgame interview with Utah Jazz players when I noticed the Minnesota Timberwolves were just standing against the border of the field and sometimes on it for a match. It’s not unique to the Mavericks.

    So how do you prevent this sort of thing from happening? That is supposed to be what fines are for. But that doesn’t seem like a deterrent.

    According to an NBA spokesperson, when asked who pays the Mavericks’ fines, “in this case, the money comes from the organization, not the players.” So the players aren’t affected and their behavior doesn’t change and there doesn’t seem to have been an edict from billionaire owner Mark Cuban telling his players to stay off the field when not in the match.

    Even though the money came from the players, fines don’t bother NBA players. In a 2021 article by Joe Vardon of The Atheltic, which detailed how the NBA fine is used, Draymond Green made it clear that fines weren’t going to stop him from breaking the rules.

    “I’ve been fined so many times, it doesn’t bother me at all at this point,” said Green, whose fines over the past two seasons were equal to about eight-tenths of one percent of his annual salary. average of $25 million.

    “Every tech he draws is subject to a $2,000 fine,” Vardon wrote. “Taking into account his other infractions, verbal attacks on umpires and even a tampering charge, Green has been fined $200,000 in the previous two years by the league’s front office.

    Vardon went on to detail where the money goes from NBA teams, players and owners. In short, it is split between the NBA and the NBPA and then donated to various charities. It’s certainly a good use of the money the league receives from technical fouls, suspensions, flagrant fouls and other violations. But the Mavericks’ recent fines have made me think more about the area around the field.

    Players on the bench must not be able to breathe on the neck of any player in the game. This kind of closeness is simply not necessary. In this sense, we should protect players and spectators from injury around the pitch. Fans, baseline photographers, scorekeepers and inactive players are all so close to the pitch that they are at risk of being landed, kicked in the face or injured by being in space landing players.

    And of course, we can’t forget the barf game in Sacramento this season, when a fan blocked a game after throwing up on the field. Drinks are spilled, fans throw objects on the court and basketball players become impromptu competitive hurdles as they attempt to navigate courtside seats.

    When fans weren’t allowed in NBA arenas at the start of the pandemic, and then when they started allowing limited fans in arenas, there were stricter policies around proximity to the field that prevented some of these things to happen, so we know it’s possible.

    And it would be very easy for the NBA to restrict bench players to a certain area near the bench. The problem is money.

    NBA teams won’t push fans back to courtside because they don’t want to give up revenue from those high-priced seats. Eliminating front row seats to give players a dedicated bench section would also reduce revenue, so that won’t happen either.

    Should fans be able to spill their drinks and vomit on the pitch? No. Should players be at risk of injury due to the proximity of fans to the pitch? No. Should inactive players be able to stand on the pitch or be so close that they can see every pore of a player’s face in-game? No. Can the NBA and NBA owners make the necessary changes to prevent these things? Yes. Are they going? No.

    Sarah Todd is the Utah Jazz Rhythms Editor for the Deseret News.

    Dallas Mavericks players watch from the bench as goaltender Luka Doncic shoots a free throw in Game 1 of the Western Conference Finals against the Golden State Warriors in San Francisco on Wednesday, May 18, 2022.

    Jeff Chiu, Associated Press

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    The Commission unveiled the 12 winners of the VET Excellence Awards https://knightbilham.com/the-commission-unveiled-the-12-winners-of-the-vet-excellence-awards/ Tue, 24 May 2022 03:06:18 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/the-commission-unveiled-the-12-winners-of-the-vet-excellence-awards/ European Vocational Skills Week took place across Europe and beyond last week (16-20 May). Organized annually by the European Commission, it is an opportunity to celebrate best practice in vocational education and training (VET), bringing together everyone involved – from local to national and regional authorities, students, teachers and actors from education and training organizations […]]]>

    European Vocational Skills Week took place across Europe and beyond last week (16-20 May). Organized annually by the European Commission, it is an opportunity to celebrate best practice in vocational education and training (VET), bringing together everyone involved – from local to national and regional authorities, students, teachers and actors from education and training organizations – to present the benefits that VET offers to young people and adults alike. This year’s sixth edition focused on “VET and the Green Transition”, helping people to acquire the skills needed for the green transition, in line with the European Green Deal.

    During the VET Excellence Awards ceremony, the Commission announced the winners of this flagship award in different categories. An apprentice accountant from Greece, the Piedmont region of Italy and a Swedish tree care program received the European Vocational Skills Week 2022 Excellence Award, along with 9 other winners.

    Vice President for the Promotion of the European Way of Life, Margaritis Schinasmentioned: “It is great to see so many outstanding nominees and winners, celebrating the real benefits that vocational education and training can offer everyone, young and old alike. They show the transformational impact that education and training can have on people’s careers and lives. I would also like to give a “special mention” to our partners in Ukraine. We have worked closely, also through the European Training Foundation, and will continue to do so, to provide support on issues such as qualifications, to help the people of Ukraine in these extremely difficult times.

    Commissioner for Employment and Social Rights, Nicolas schmitmentioned: “The green transition can become a real job driver if people are given the support they need to succeed in their careers and in changing labor markets. The VET Excellence Awards help us identify the best approaches to becoming fit to the green economy, overcoming the current labor shortages in key sectors such as construction, manufacturing and energy. I would like to congratulate all the nominees and VET learners, and to thank the thousands of vocational education and training providers for their dedication.”

    This year’s winners

    The Commission granted 12 awards in four categories and a special mention to apprentices, projects, companies and regions, from the EU, neighboring and neighboring countries, who have successfully used VET to build a greener, more digital and more inclusive society.

    Winners include:

    • Evangelos Pouftasapprentice in an accounting firm in Greecewhich demonstrated the key role of apprentices in accelerating the digital transition of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), helping the company’s customers to digitize their work, such as setting up online services to remain competitive , particularly in the context of the COVID-19 Pandemic and the increase in remote working.
    • the Piedmont region in Italy,with the support of the European Social Fund, promoted among young learners a culture of sustainability in food production and consumption along the agri-food chain.
    • the Project “Certification of Veterans Tree Management Skills” by Stiftelsen Pro Natura. This Swedish programme, funded by Erasmus+, is designed to raise the standard of care for trees that have an exceptional value for the conservation of nature, landscape or culture, called “veteran trees”.

    The other winners are:

    • AKMI SA, Greece
    • Program ‘Professional inclusion and equal opportunities for the most disadvantaged’, ALMI BILBAO SAL, Spain
    • Cyclades – 5and Patra Evening Vocational High School, Greece
    • Environmental and agricultural education at school, Georgia
    • Teacher. Dr. Linda Clarke, University of Westminster, UK
    • ÖBB Infrastructure AG, Austria
    • Otto Stöckl Elektroinstallationen GmbH, Austria
    • Riga State Technical School, Latvia
    • virtual dawn, Finland

    In addition to the prizes in the different categories, a special mention to Ukrainian partners who, together with the European Training Foundation, have reformed their education and training systems, focusing on qualifications, the future of skills in key economic sectors and governance arrangements to modernize the system and bring it closer of the EU system.

    EU actions to promote VET

    The Commission actively promotes vocational education and training as part of its work to implement the European Pillar of Social Rights, and in particular the right to education, training and lifelong learning of life. This is also important to achieve the main objective of the EU Action Plan on the European Pillar of Social Rights to which all partners committed at the Porto Social Summit: at least 60% of all adults should participate to training every year.

    On 1 July 2020, the Commission proposed a Council Recommendation on Vocational Education and Training, to make VET more modern, attractive, flexible and fit for the digital age and the green transition. This proposal is in line with other Commission initiatives, such as the European Skills Agenda and the Communication on supporting youth employment – ​​A gateway to employment for the next generation.

    In addition, the Commission presented in December 2021 proposals for individual learning accounts and micro-certificates, to help open up more possibilities for people to find learning offers and employment opportunities.

    The European Commission also supports vocational education and training through significant funding, such as through the European Social Fund Plus (with a total budget of nearly €99.3 billion for 2021-2027) , Erasmus+ and the Recovery and Resilience Facility, which has “reskilling and upskilling” as one of its seven flagship areas for reform and investment.

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    NGLC Giving Circle awards nearly $20,000 to emerging organizations fighting climate change – SupChina https://knightbilham.com/nglc-giving-circle-awards-nearly-20000-to-emerging-organizations-fighting-climate-change-supchina/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/nglc-giving-circle-awards-nearly-20000-to-emerging-organizations-fighting-climate-change-supchina/ NGLC Giving Circle awards nearly $20,000 to emerging organizations fighting climate change – SupChina Jump straight to content Search any company based in China Search any company based in ChinaBeijingWeimeng ChuangkeBeijing SohuBaozunTuniu CorporationGenetron ManagementCanton RailwayCNOOCTrip to ShanghaiGuangdong Hybribio BiotechOcean-scale investmentGuangshen RailwayVNET GroupSohuCITICJCET GroupGenetron HealthZhejiang Geely Holding GroupChina Development Bank International InvestmentCASILBYD automaticBeiGene (Beijing)Beijing Pingxin Media […]]]>




    NGLC Giving Circle awards nearly $20,000 to emerging organizations fighting climate change – SupChina























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    After a two-year hiatus, the Open Forum returns to Davos at a crucial juncture in history https://knightbilham.com/after-a-two-year-hiatus-the-open-forum-returns-to-davos-at-a-crucial-juncture-in-history/ Sun, 22 May 2022 15:10:17 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/after-a-two-year-hiatus-the-open-forum-returns-to-davos-at-a-crucial-juncture-in-history/ African countries are at the forefront of vital transformation of food systems to simultaneously address food security, nutrition, social and environmental protection – while building resilience – the UN chief said on Thursday. António Guterres was speaking at the start of a high-level political dialogue at the United Nations headquarters in New York, as part […]]]>

    African countries are at the forefront of vital transformation of food systems to simultaneously address food security, nutrition, social and environmental protection – while building resilience – the UN chief said on Thursday.

    António Guterres was speaking at the start of a high-level political dialogue at the United Nations headquarters in New York, as part of the Africa 2022 dialogue series, convened to build food supply resilience across the continent, at a time when “decades of progress on hunger are being reversed.”

    Deep connections

    He said that for too long nutrition, food security, conflict, climate change, ecosystems and health have been treated as separate concerns,”but these global challenges are deeply interconnected. Conflict creates hunger. The climate crisis amplifies conflictsand the systemic problems only get worse.

    He noted that after more than a decade of improvements, one in five Africans were undernourished in 2020, while 61 million African children are affected by stunting. Women and girls bear the brunt of it, and when food is scarce, “they are often the last to eat; and the first to be taken out of school and forced to work or marry.”

    Mr Guterres said humanitarians and UN partners were doing all they could to meet Africa’s needs in times of crisis, but aid ‘cannot compete with the systemic drivers of hunger’ .

    Compounding the situation were other “external shocks”, such as an uneven recovery from the pandemic and the war in Ukraine, with African countries among the hardest hit by grain shortages and rising debt.

    On the front lines of the climate crisis

    Building resilience also means addressing the climate crisis.

    African farmers are on the frontlines of our planet’s warming, from rising temperatures to droughts and floods,” he said.

    “Africa needs massive technical and financial support to adapt to the impact of the climate emergency and provide renewable electricity across the continent.”

    He added that developed countries must honor their $100 billion climate finance pledge to developing countries, with the help of international financial institutions, so that African countries, in particular, can invest in a strong post-recovery. the COVID-19 pandemic, to the tide of renewable energy.

    Food systems, said the Secretary-General, “connect all these challengesas highlighted at the UN Food Systems Summit last September.

    “Many African Member States have called for fundamental change, through inclusive transformative pathways, which aim to address – simultaneously – food security, nutrition, social protection, environmental conservation and resilience to shocks”.

    He welcomed the decision of the African Union (AU) to designate 2022 as the Year of Nutrition – a promise to act on the strong commitments made at the Summit.

    Collective expertise

    “Through national, regional and global cooperation, we must build on lessons learned and harness collective expertise. Together, we must deliver on these pathways,” Mr. Guterres added.

    The international community must rise to the occasion“, he said, adding that reducing support when demand is at an all-time high was “not an option”.

    Official development assistance, or ODA, based on a percentage of available public funds, is needed more than ever, he said.

    “I urge all countries to show solidarity, invest in resilience and prevent the current crisis from worsening further.”

    The UN chief said during his recent visit to Senegal, Niger and Nigeria, he was inspired by the resilience and determination of the people he met.

    “Women and young people in particular have engaged in sustainable and sustainable solutions that allow them to live in peace with their neighbors and with nature.

    If we work together, if we put people and planet before profit, we can transform food systemsachieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and leave no one behind. »

    The ambitious goals, he concluded, of ending hunger and malnutrition by the fast approaching 2030 deadline, were realistic and achievable.

    “The United Nations stands by your side, every step of the way.

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    World Bank supports education recovery strategy in Brazil https://knightbilham.com/world-bank-supports-education-recovery-strategy-in-brazil/ Mon, 16 May 2022 01:50:30 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/world-bank-supports-education-recovery-strategy-in-brazil/ Polish President Andrzej Duda has harshly rebuked Russia for its invasion of Ukraine, promising “100% support” for President Volodymyr Zelensky and calling on Moscow to pay reparations to kyiv. “I simply cannot accept that Russia can violate international law with impunity.” Russian aggression against Ukraine has rekindled unity within the West and underlined for many […]]]>

    Polish President Andrzej Duda has harshly rebuked Russia for its invasion of Ukraine, promising “100% support” for President Volodymyr Zelensky and calling on Moscow to pay reparations to kyiv. “I simply cannot accept that Russia can violate international law with impunity.”

    Russian aggression against Ukraine has rekindled unity within the West and underlined for many Western countries the importance of democratic values. Finland and Sweden, in particular, have set aside their longstanding policies of neutrality and have applied to join NATO. “We are in a totally new situation and we have to realize this,” said Finnish Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto, noting that the collapse of Europe’s post-war security architecture, as well as the Russia’s increased appetite for risk, were among the main factors that pushed Finland to apply for membership.

    Haavisto said that in this “grey period” between the Nordic country’s application to join the alliance and its eventual full membership, when it will receive mutual security protection under Article 5 of the NATO charter, NATO members have assured Finland and Sweden that they will guarantee security. Asked about Turkey’s stated objection to extending membership to Finland and Sweden, he said he was confident that Helsinki could address the concerns.

    Alarmed by an increasingly competitive geopolitical landscape marked by growing friction between the United States and China, Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud, Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister, stressed the need for cooperation.

    “If we’ve learned anything from COVID, it’s that we need to focus on cooperation and I think we need to keep looking for ways to foster that cooperation. Even when there are differences, when there are has competition, we need to find mechanisms to talk to each other.He noted that Saudi Arabia, which values ​​both its extensive commercial relationship with China and its national security relationship with the United States, is well placed to facilitate dialogue between the major world powers.

    Prince Faisal’s remarks were echoed by Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, who commented on the ‘binary choice’ that countries with close ties to both China and the United States are increasingly called to do. “We usually get asked this question all the time: who do you choose? It shows how far we have fallen as a global community,” she said. This is particularly difficult, she noted, for a country like Pakistan, which is already in a fiscal crisis and now faces “a superimposed food security crisis”.

    Gregory W. Meeks, Democratic Congressman from New York’s 6and district and chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, hailed the bipartisan support for a recent Senate bill pledging $40 billion in humanitarian and military assistance to Ukraine, as well as the broad international support the benefited.

    He also focused on the potential food crisis, stressing the need to break the blockade of Ukrainian Black Sea ports so that Ukrainian grain can be delivered to the many countries that depend on it. “You have to open [the port of Odessa] because it was not limited to what is happening in Ukraine; it threatens the whole world.

    Madrid is hosting the NATO summit next month and Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Albares Bueno has hailed the alliance’s response to Russian aggression in Ukraine. But he underlined the threat that the looming food crisis, if left unresolved, could pose to Europe. Noting that the Sahel – the region of North Africa bordering the Sahara – is not only already deeply food insecure, he warned that rising grain prices could trigger potentially destabilizing migration to the north. “Unity is our best defense.”

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