Stereoscopic – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 22:16:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://knightbilham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-02T220243.831.png Stereoscopic – Knight Bilham http://knightbilham.com/ 32 32 3D is back. But do we really want to wear these glasses again? https://knightbilham.com/3d-is-back-but-do-we-really-want-to-wear-these-glasses-again/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 20:03:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/3d-is-back-but-do-we-really-want-to-wear-these-glasses-again/ James Croot is the editor of Stuff to Watch. OPINION: Just when you thought it was finally safe to return to the cinema – with or without a mask depending on your Covid sensibilities – one of the film industry’s potentially most annoying gadgets is back. Seemingly almost single-handedly, Wairarapa’s most famous farmer and occasional […]]]>

James Croot is the editor of Stuff to Watch.

OPINION: Just when you thought it was finally safe to return to the cinema – with or without a mask depending on your Covid sensibilities – one of the film industry’s potentially most annoying gadgets is back.

Seemingly almost single-handedly, Wairarapa’s most famous farmer and occasional filmmaker, James Cameron, is determined to bring about the fourth wave of stereoscopic cinema.

In truth, 3D movies never really disappeared, but they’ve all but disappeared from our multiplexes since Matt Damon battled various Chinese beasts over five years ago.

READ MORE:
* Avatar 2: why 3D movies are coming back for good
* Buckle up for 4D cinema – it’ll be a wet, windy and wild ride
* James Cameron wants Avatar sequels to be 3D without glasses
* Cinematic experience “could go the way of DVD stores”

Now, thanks to the reappearance of Cameron’s blockbuster, 2009’s record-breaking sci-fi adventure Avatar in cinemas this week, ahead of potentially four sequels, partly filmed in New Zealand over the next six years (starting with Avatar: The Way of Water on December 15), cinemas up and down the motu must dust off their reusable glasses (and arguably sanitizing since their last pre-covid use) and stock up on disposable glasses.

3D glasses are back, but will Kiwi audiences be ready to put them on again?

Iain McGregor / Stuff

3D glasses are back, but will Kiwi audiences be ready to put them on again?

But while the man who also gave the world such popular cinema as Titanic, Terminator 2: Judgment Day and Aliens is convinced that 3D was never really over, it has, he says – like color 80 years ago – “just been accepted” and that one day soon we will be able to watch it without the need for special glasses, the prospect of wearing headaches, scratches, light reduction (and in a cinema 2022 crowded, perhaps relentlessly fog-prone) pieces of cardboard and/or plastic while packing an extra price tag for the privilege seems like unnecessary faff, especially in these straightened times.

Of course, I understand the need for theaters to find ways to differentiate the cinematic experience from watching a movie on a streaming service at home, but raising the average price of a single ticket above that that you’d pay for a month of seemingly endless content seems like the opposite. -productive.

If I want to pay extra, I’d rather spend it on more comfortable, roomier seats and superior sound and vision for those immersive few hours of escape from our increasingly troubled world. And hasn’t going to the cinema been a much more pleasant experience since ticket prices have become more affordable and cinemas have done away with the old-fashioned “stadium seats” of the 90s – once that the thrill of the last 3D wave faded a decade ago?

We're told 3D never really went away, but who's seen a pair since around 2017?

Dean Kozanic / Stuff

We’re told 3D never really went away, but who’s seen a pair since around 2017?

Let’s not forget that 3D has always been Hollywood’s answer to declining audiences, whether the threat comes from television, home video, the internet, or a global pandemic.

Although stereoscopic imagery was first created in the late 1890s, it didn’t actually make a massive appearance until the 1950s. Green and red paper fold-out glasses abounded in movie theaters, so that audiences were thrilled by horrors like House of Wax and The Creature From The Black Lagoon and perplexed by the sight of a pneumatic Anne Miller singing Always True to You in My Fashion in Kiss Me Kate. However, there were some major limitations – the two prints needed for 3D to work had to be exactly in sync or it became a headache and a mess causing eye strain. Additionally, theater owners disliked it because its limited viewing range meant secondary seats could not be sold.

Consequently, public enthusiasm waned until more relaxed censorship rules in the United States allowed the introduction of 3D pornography, such as 1969’s The Stewardesses (one of the highest-grossing films ever made). ) and 1973’s Flesh for Frankenstein.

Avatar's return could be just the start of a 3D renaissance - or so James Cameron hopes.

Getty

Avatar’s return could be just the start of a 3D renaissance – or so James Cameron hopes.

But a lack of interest again saw the concept shelved until the early 1980s, when the movie industry was threatened by growing interest in home video. Again, 3D flashed briefly, in low-budget horror sequels for franchises such as Friday the 13th, Jaws, and Amityville.

More than 20 years later, 3D is resurfacing, not out of great artistic will, but rather to fight against the rise of downloading and piracy on the Internet. Granted, the image quality was better, the glasses were a bit more comfortable, and rather than filtering out colors, the systems presented separate color images to each eye.

In 2009, DreamWorks Animation Worldwide Stereoscopic Supervisor Phil McNally explained that the new technology uses unique digital projectors that perfectly synchronize and align the two streams of images for the brain to read them in 3D. “Basically, 3D happens in the brain,” he said.

Oscar-nominated filmmaker turned movie underwriter Ralph Hirshorn added that 1950s 3-D “was hokey like a pop-up children’s book, objects pushing you from the screen. This new 3-D pulls you into across the screen and into the stage”. And yes, you can tilt your head without the image becoming blurry.

Andy Warhol's Flesh for Frankenstein 3-D was one of the most sinister uses of the format in the early 1970s.

Getty

Andy Warhol’s Flesh for Frankenstein 3-D was one of the most sinister uses of the format in the early 1970s.

An optimistic Tim Partridge of Dolby said he hoped a 3D version of each film would be available one day and added that critics have been wrong more than once.

“When we introduced surround sound and digital audio, [they said] that it would only be used for big action movies. And yet, every movie deserves to have technology that makes it more realistic. That’s what filmmakers try to do – try to engage you in the story.

“In real life we ​​have surround sound, in real life we ​​have 3D, so why shouldn’t 3D benefit all films?”

Thanks to the mega-success of Avatar in 2009, everyone from Ang Lee to Sir Peter Jackson and even Martin Scorsese were persuaded to try the format, but ultimately, perhaps because of too many 3D conversions shoddy 2D shot movies weary audiences of what was essentially a pared-down experience, little more than a gimmick that glossed over and – indeed – highlighted shoddy storytelling.

Now only the biggest blockbusters are released in 3D, just like they are in IMAX, and New Zealand’s three major cinema chains (Hoyts, Readings and Event) have been content to let the format die.

Their resolve will be tested by the power of Disney and Cameron, who, if successful, would only allow Avatar: The Way of the Water to be viewed in 3-D. However, I think all it would do would be to persuade many potential viewers to stay home.

Avatar (M) is now showing in theaters nationwide for a limited time, with select sessions available for 3D viewing.

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The legendary modder is working to bring all Unreal Engine games to VR https://knightbilham.com/the-legendary-modder-is-working-to-bring-all-unreal-engine-games-to-vr/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 05:51:27 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/the-legendary-modder-is-working-to-bring-all-unreal-engine-games-to-vr/ Virtual reality is one of the coolest and most functional current next steps in gaming. Placing players in these virtual worlds, having them look around, move their arms and sometimes even their whole body can really improve the game. ‘experience. Simple games can feel wonderful, fast-paced games are exhilarating, and scary games experience a whole […]]]>

Virtual reality is one of the coolest and most functional current next steps in gaming. Placing players in these virtual worlds, having them look around, move their arms and sometimes even their whole body can really improve the game. ‘experience. Simple games can feel wonderful, fast-paced games are exhilarating, and scary games experience a whole new level of terrifying. But developing for VR is a ton of work, and it’s still kind of niche, so there’s not nearly as many VR as possible. Thankfully, again, modders are working to help change all that.

Dedicated people work hard to bring us amazing VR experiences through older games. We saw this epic Half-Life 2 VR mod, (opens in a new tab) explored the high fantasy land of Skyrim, (opens in a new tab) and even games like Valheim are going VR (opens in a new tab). Mixed News (opens in a new tab) recounts a recent update to a VR mod project called Universal Mod that could bring hundreds of games to this new perspective.

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James Cameron says Rush to ‘Cash in the Boom at Theatres’ was the reason 3D TVs failed https://knightbilham.com/james-cameron-says-rush-to-cash-in-the-boom-at-theatres-was-the-reason-3d-tvs-failed/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 23:33:01 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/james-cameron-says-rush-to-cash-in-the-boom-at-theatres-was-the-reason-3d-tvs-failed/ james cameron Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty james cameron offers its two cents on the home 3D experience. While promoting the reissue of Avatarthe filmmaker spoke about the failure of 3D televisions and the future of the experience for users, telling IGN“I think the jury is out on that.” “I know why it all failed because there was […]]]>

james cameron

Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty

james cameron offers its two cents on the home 3D experience.

While promoting the reissue of Avatarthe filmmaker spoke about the failure of 3D televisions and the future of the experience for users, telling IGN“I think the jury is out on that.”

“I know why it all failed because there was – what they did was they got into 3D trying to take advantage of the cinema boom and treat it like a feature film “, he explained. “So they did 3D, but they did it with glasses that had to be recharged and all that. While on the horizon were big flat screen televisions without glasses that had the looks pretty good.”

james cameron

james cameron

Jeff Spicer/WireImage james cameron

RELATED: James Cameron Says He Could ‘Hand On’ Not Directing ‘Avatar’ 4 & 5 Himself

Cameron, 68, continued: “Not everyone is a movie geek like me where you sit down, put the glasses on by yourself and watch a whole movie, which is more what the theatrical experience. So it kind of became out of step.”

Responding to the question of whether the technology could return, he added: “I think it’s possible, but I can’t say because the home viewing experience is fundamentally different from the theater experience.”

“I’m perfectly happy if the only place you can really get it is in a movie theater, because it speaks to that particularity of the cinematic experience, which is obviously what the Avatar the reissue is in the first place,” he added.

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Cameron is known for his work as a director of Avatar which was filmed in 3D technology and became one of the highest-grossing films of all time. He also helped create the Fusion 3D digital camera system which was developed as a means of filming stereoscopic 3D items.

The first of four sequels to the Avatar franchise is set to hit theaters on December 16 and will run for three hours. During an interview with Empire in July, Cameron raised concerns around the duration of the film.

“I don’t want anyone complaining about the length when they sit and stare excessively [television] for eight hours,” Cameron told the outlet.

RELATED: Avatar 2: Sequel’s Next-Gen Cast First Look

“It’s like, give me a fucking break. I watched my kids sit down and do five hour-long episodes straight,” he continued. “Here’s the big social paradigm shift that needs to happen: It’s okay to get up and go pee.”

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Paige Emery: Methods to decipher, intimate eyes that listen https://knightbilham.com/paige-emery-methods-to-decipher-intimate-eyes-that-listen/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/paige-emery-methods-to-decipher-intimate-eyes-that-listen/ Mount Wilson ObservatoryMount Wilson Circular Trail and Mount Wilson Trail – Mount WilsonDetails 34.2251784 -118.06432569999998 Date hourDate(s) – 09/16/202210:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. LocationMount Wilson Observatory Category(ies) Methods to decipher, intimate eyes that listen considers the space of intimate otherness in the interpretation of data. Between astronomical stereoscopy and intuitive reading, […]]]>


34.2251784
-118.06432569999998


Date hour
Date(s) – 09/16/2022
10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.


Location
Mount Wilson Observatory


Category(ies)


Methods to decipher, intimate eyes that listen considers the space of intimate otherness in the interpretation of data.

Between astronomical stereoscopy and intuitive reading, the installation draws attention to how humans use their senses as a conduit to understand information. Connecting to the environment for a more than human deep listening practice is a crucial aid for research methodologies that explore cosmologies.

An extension of the FEELERS exhibitionproduced by SUPERCOLLIDER on the occasion of Fulcrum Festival 2022, so the installation will be located at the belvedere at the southern end of the main car park, near the entrance to Mount Wilson Observatory.

About the artist

paige emery the work links poetics and praxis, mysticism and theory, healing rituals and environmental science. This takes shape through art installations for intercommunication between humans and non-humans, sound pieces for deep listening between the psychic and physical realms, and healing gardens for non-linear time and regenerative metabolism. His work often inhabits site-specific natural spaces such as the Biosphere 2 closed ecological system in Arizona and in guerrilla gardens at sites of political unrest. Emery is also an embodied gardener and plant practitioner, currently working on a regenerative ecology project with a Regen Network grant and working on the intersections of art and science as a SUPERCOLLIDER SciArt Cohort. His poetic rituals have been published by Ignota Books.

Katlyn Ong
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The 2022 SeaShorts Film Festival seeks to reinvent the way stories are told https://knightbilham.com/the-2022-seashorts-film-festival-seeks-to-reinvent-the-way-stories-are-told/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 03:40:00 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/the-2022-seashorts-film-festival-seeks-to-reinvent-the-way-stories-are-told/ Welcome to a world beyond what you can touch and feel. The annual SeaShorts film festival, which celebrates short films from Southeast Asia, returns this year as an on-site event after two years of virtual programming due to the pandemic. The next festival will be held at Cyberjaya Multimedia University (MMU) from September 21-25. Its […]]]>

Welcome to a world beyond what you can touch and feel.

The annual SeaShorts film festival, which celebrates short films from Southeast Asia, returns this year as an on-site event after two years of virtual programming due to the pandemic.

The next festival will be held at Cyberjaya Multimedia University (MMU) from September 21-25.

Its theme, Coming, captures the spirit of exploration and forward thinking, inspiring viewers to boldly go where no one has gone before.

There will be over 70 films to see at SeaShorts 2022 across multiple sections of the festival, including the sixth annual Seashorts competition where the winner will be announced at the closing of the festival.

Along with screenings, workshops and forums, this year’s festival sees a series of updated features, including a particular focus that explores potential new cinematic technologies, such as the use of virtual reality (VR) and artificial intelligence (AI) in film content development. .

A scene from Mahen Bala and Zarif Ismail’s “To Enter The Forest” VR project, which takes viewers deep into the Malaysian jungle to learn more about the Batek tribe. Picture: handout

Filmmakers, industry professionals, artists and fans of film and cinema from Southeast Asia are perhaps the usual demographic for SeaShorts, but this year the organizing committee aims to attract a mainstream audience, especially the TikTok generation and people eager to learn how the lines between storytelling and technology are now blurred.

The “screen time” phenomenon during the pandemic has changed the number of people watching movies.

“In these times when a one-minute video is too long, let’s ask ourselves, what is a movie? Why should a movie be 100 minutes long? I think cinema is alive and well, but it needs to be rediscovered. Come see films in SeaShorts – in the cinema, or in Virtual Reality, or watch a 10-hour silent film accompanied by musicians and sound artists”, explains Tan Chui Mui, artistic director of Seashorts 2022, who is also the founder of the festival.

Gan Siong King’s “My Video Making Practice” is a community engagement project that blends an artist talk, screening and dialogue where he reflects on his works from the past decade. Photo: SeaShorts Film Festival

“If you want to challenge yourself more, check out what’s happening at Open Screen, where there are performances and screenings beyond what we expect from ‘cinema’ or join an AI Generative Art workshop (by Eddie Wong) where you will learn how to create speculative fiction with the art of AI,” she adds.

Narration: the next frontier

SeaShorts’ first-ever VR exhibit is also expected to draw a crowd. Title Beyond Mirage, this program is hosted by Dr Lim Kok Yoong and co-hosted by Dr Roopesh Sitharan and Dendi Permadi. It presents 12 works from Southeast Asia, South Korea and Taiwan.

“This exhibition tests and measures the boundaries of our reality. It is made up of facilities that provide participants with a headset that transmits 360° stereoscopic images. The device reads our head movement to synchronize the stereoscopic visual, giving us the impression that we are physically present in a scene,” says Lim.

“However, the feeling of our feet still touching the ground reminds us that we are still in the real world. This gives us the option to choose between reality or a simulated experience.

A scene from the short film 'Anonymous' by Sojung Bahng (South Korea).  Photo: SeaShorts Film FestivalA scene from the short film ‘Anonymous’ by Sojung Bahng (South Korea). Photo: SeaShorts Film Festival

“If the virtual world could give you all the experience you could want, would you embrace simulation and neglect the physical world? Would you wake up if you were told that your life so far has been an illusion? Or would you continue to live in Zhuangzi’s dream – a fluttering butterfly, happily doing whatever it wants? ” he adds.

If you’ve had a taste of what it feels like to walk around in a VR environment, it wouldn’t be a stretch to imagine wanting to stay there forever.

Some work at beyond the mirage are interactive pieces, allowing the audience to move around the virtual world and manipulate virtual objects to help move the film’s narrative.

“During the pandemic, many filmmakers have had to become more resourceful and find ways to continue to develop their craft. It has opened up more possibilities for them in filmmaking, pushing them to incorporate new technologies to tell stories,” says SeaShorts 2022 Festival Director Goh Lee Kwang, who is also a multidisciplinary artist.

“Also, they’ve become more introspective with their storytelling, perhaps due to the time spent in isolation. Virtual reality can break down the barriers that separate a film from a viewer. It’s a highly immersive that has the ability to create very impactful experiences,” he adds.

Okui Lala and Nasrikah’s “Rasa Dan Asa” follows the activities of members of Pertimig (Indonesian Association of Migrant Domestic Workers in Malaysia) during the pandemic, with most of the film’s footage shot remotely. Picture: handout

Goh describes them as a new breed of storytellers and the future of Malaysian cinema, adding that

SeaShorts is the only place this year to experience all of these VR films, including four films by Malaysian filmmakers, in one sitting.

“It might surprise audiences how each of our filmmakers has a unique approach to VR storytelling. For example, Mahen Bala and Zarif Ismail’s Cep bah hep (To enter the forest) is a VR documentary about the indigenous Batek people (scattered in the deep jungles of Pahang and Kelantan). Meanwhile, Fariz Hanapiah and Idril Mihat Pick up the VR horror experience places you as a highway patrolman on the Karak Highway who decides to help a stranded woman before all hell breaks loose,” says Goh.

In another Malaysian work, Vimala Perumal Cow Rojak Cow puts the muhibbah mix in the story of an Indian family who asks for the blessing of a ceremonial cow for their housewarming prayers.

Vimala Perumal's VR short film 'Rojak Cow Cow' is inspired by a story told by her father, about a new neighbor who brought a cow up a flight of stairs to the apartment for the blessing ceremony of a new house.  Photo: SeaShorts Film FestivalVimala Perumal’s VR short film ‘Rojak Cow Cow’ is inspired by a story told by her father, about a new neighbor who brought a cow up a flight of stairs to the apartment for the blessing ceremony of a new house. Photo: SeaShorts Film Festival

On the Asian front, the work of Sojung Bahng (South Korea) Anonymous, a real-time cinematic 3D virtual reality experience that applies gaze-based interaction, invites viewers to access the perspective of objects in a domestic setting where an elderly man living alone spends his day under the gaze of his wife’s portrait deceased.

Regarding the concept of memory, space and time, Taiwanese artist and filmmaker Singing Chen Afterimage for tomorrow builds further on this intriguing premise.

It’s time to experiment

Some movies in beyond the mirage will have their Malaysian premiere at the festival, as Big Hoax: The Moon Landing by John Hsu and Marco Lococo and House by Hsu Chih-Yen, two films officially selected for the Tribeca Film Festival and the Venice International Film Festival in 2020.

Other special highlights are Whose hand plays this sound, organized by Chloe Yap Mun Ee, which presents young artists and filmmakers and their personal approaches; and What’s inside the sea curated by Jacky Yeap, a cheeky selection of short films from Japan and Southeast Asia exploring the medium’s playful and inventive potential for cinematic storytelling.

A still from 'Great Hoax: The Moon Landing' by Marco Lococo and John Hsu (Taiwan), part of the 2022 SeaShorts International Program. Photo: SeaShorts Film Festival A still from ‘Great Hoax: The Moon Landing’ by Marco Lococo and John Hsu (Taiwan), part of the 2022 SeaShorts International Program. Photo: SeaShorts Film Festival

The workshops, conferences and forums of this festival are also geared towards introducing new technological approaches to storytelling,

Yap, also programmer of SeaShorts 2022, notes that in programs such as Beyond the mirage, sea what’s inside and Whose hand plays this sound, artists and filmmakers take nuanced and thoughtful approaches with their chosen tools, allowing us not only to reconsider familiar modes of cinema or the moving image, but also to consider what is so uncomfortable about the feeling of “novelty” when we think of using them. tools.

“These programs would hopefully change our expectations not just by looking at the future as represented by ‘the advent of technology’ and ‘sparkling newness’, but rather by looking at it as a point in time, lifting the lid of the box to see if the named cat Coming is in there. And everyone alive right now is having a little fun, doing our little experiments and hoping for the best,” Yap concludes.

More information here.

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Lots of choices, but which game console do Montanese prefer? https://knightbilham.com/lots-of-choices-but-which-game-console-do-montanese-prefer/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:51:29 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/lots-of-choices-but-which-game-console-do-montanese-prefer/ Having a teenager at home, I am familiar with all the game consoles that are available. LUCKY for me, he prefers playing on his PC, so the days of buying the new Xbox and PS-whatever are over. With a bit of luck. Photo by Resul Kaya on UnsplashPhoto by Resul Kaya on Unsplash So what […]]]>

Having a teenager at home, I am familiar with all the game consoles that are available. LUCKY for me, he prefers playing on his PC, so the days of buying the new Xbox and PS-whatever are over. With a bit of luck.

Photo by Resul Kaya on Unsplash
Photo by Resul Kaya on Unsplash

So what do the Montanans prefer when it comes to their favorite consoles? According to a survey by Casinocrypto.com, the Xbox Series is the most preferred gaming console.

From favorite to least favorite, you can see where these 5 Montana cities ranked each console.

BOZEMAN: Xbox, Nintendo Switch, PS5 and finally, the PC.

BILLING: Xbox, Nintendo Switch, PS5 and PC come last. Kind of surprising that the Switch came in second considering it’s around 5 years old.

Photo by Louis-Philippe Poitras on Unsplash
Photo by Louis-Philippe Poitras on Unsplash

Missoula: Xbox, PS5, Nintendo Switch and once again PC takes last place when it comes to favorites.

GREAT FALLS: PS5, Xbox, Nintendo Switch, then PC. The only city where the PS5 beats the Xbox.

Photo by Martin Katler on Unsplash
Photo by Martin Katler on Unsplash

HELEN: Xbox, Nintendo Switch, PS5, followed by PC coming in last place for all the cities listed in the study for Montana.

Personally, I’ve never even played on the Nintendo Switch, but apparently a lot of Montanese really like it because it’s the second most favorite game console. I played on all the others and my child too.

Photo by Vinal Gunasekera on Unsplash
Photo by Vinal Gunasekera on Unsplash

All I know about all this gaming stuff is that I grew up with the original Nintendo and a Sega and when it comes to “modern” game consoles I can yank you on Call of Duty from Xbox. I can’t figure out PS remotes, they just don’t feel right. I stick to what I know.

cc: Casinocrypto.com

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Meta shows AI-based AR for VR headsets https://knightbilham.com/meta-shows-ai-based-ar-for-vr-headsets/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 10:12:29 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/meta-shows-ai-based-ar-for-vr-headsets/ Image: Reality Labs Research Der Artikel kann nur mit aktiviertem JavaScript dargestellt werden. Bitte aktiviere JavaScript in deinem Browser and lade die Seite neu. A good VR passthrough is a major technical challenge. Reality Labs researchers present a new AI-based solution. Headsets like Varjo XR-3, Quest Pro, Lynx R-1 and Apple’s next device will be […]]]>

Image: Reality Labs Research

Der Artikel kann nur mit aktiviertem JavaScript dargestellt werden. Bitte aktiviere JavaScript in deinem Browser and lade die Seite neu.

A good VR passthrough is a major technical challenge. Reality Labs researchers present a new AI-based solution.

Headsets like Varjo XR-3, Quest Pro, Lynx R-1 and Apple’s next device will be the best way to experience augmented reality for years to come.

Unlike traditional AR headsets with transparent optics like Hololens 2 and Magic Leap 2, which project AR elements directly into the eye via a waveguide display, the aforementioned headsets film the physical environment with forward-facing cameras. ‘outside, then display it on opaque screens. There they can then be extended with AR elements as desired.

The artificial synthesis of the gaze: a big problem

This technology, called Passthrough AR, has great advantages over conventional AR optics, but also its problems. The challenge is to reconstruct the physical environment using sensor data as if the person wearing the helmet saw it with their own eyes. It is an extremely difficult task.

Resolution, color fidelity, depth representation and perspective: All of these should match the natural visual impression and change with as little latency or delay as the head is moved.

Bildvergleich zwischen NeuralPassthrough and Passthrough+ auf Quest 2.

NeuralPassthrough and Passthrough+ of the Meta Quest 2 in comparison. | Image: Reality Labs Research

Perspective in particular poses great challenges for the technology, as the positions of the cameras do not correspond exactly to the positions of the eyes. This change in perspective can lead to discomfort and visual artifacts. The latter is due to the fact that the sides of a nearby object or the hands may be obscured in the camera’s view, whereas this would not be the case in the natural view.

The Meta Quest 2 shows the current state of transparent technology available to the consumer: the display of the environment is black and white, grainy and distorted, especially for objects held close to the face.

The devices mentioned above will soon provide better results or already do so, as the sensor technology is optimized for passthrough technology. However, you should not expect a perfect picture of the physical environment, as many basic issues (see above) have yet to be resolved.

AI reconstruction yields high-quality results

In August, Meta researchers unveiled several technical innovations for virtual reality at Siggraphh 2022, including a new passthrough method that reconstructs visual perspective using artificial neural networks. The technique is called NeuralPassthrough.

“We introduce NeuralPassthrough to take advantage of recent advances in deep learning, by solving passthrough as an image-based neural rendering problem. Specifically, we jointly apply stereo depth estimation and image reconstruction networks to produce the eye-point-of-view images via an end-to-end approach, suitable for today’s desktop-connected VR headsets. today and their stringent real-time requirements,” said the research document states.

logo

Diagram of the NeuralPassthrough-Algorithmus

The passthrough is not the same at all. Stereo footage from cameras undergoes a variety of AI-driven adjustments before being output to screens | Image: Xiao et al. / Research Reality Labs

The developed AI algorithm estimates the depth of the room and the objects in it and reconstructs an artificial viewing angle that matches that of the eyes. The model was trained with synthetic datasets: image sequences showing 80 spatial scenes from different viewing angles. The resulting artificial neural network is flexible and can be applied to different cameras and ocular distances.

Perfect Passthrough AR still has a “very long way” ahead of it

The results are promising. Compared to Meta Quest 2 and other passthrough methods, NeuralPassthrough provides better image quality and meets the requirements for perspective-correct stereoscopic gaze synthesis, as shown in the following video.

However, the technique has certain limitations. For example, the quality of the result strongly depends on the precision of the AI ​​space estimation. Depth sensors could improve the result in the future. Another challenge is perspective-dependent reflections on objects that the AI ​​model cannot reconstruct. This in turn leads to artifacts.

Another problem is Computing power: The prototype built specifically for research purposes (see cover photo) is powered by a desktop computer, in which runs an Intel Xeon W-2155 and two Nvidia Titan V – one high-end graphics card per eye.

The result is a passthrough image with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels and a latency of 32 milliseconds. This is too low resolution with too high latency for high quality passthrough.

“To deliver a compelling VR passthrough, the field will need to make significant progress both in image quality (i.e. removing noticeable distortion and disocclusion artifacts), while meeting the requirements strict real-time, stereoscopic and wide field of view. Tackling the additional stress of mobile processors for portable computing devices means there really is a long way to go,” the scientists write.

Find all our AI news on THE DECODER.

Sources: NeuralPassthrough: real-time view synthesis learned for virtual reality


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Rediscovering the African choir that toured Victorian Britain https://knightbilham.com/rediscovering-the-african-choir-that-toured-victorian-britain/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 13:11:55 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/rediscovering-the-african-choir-that-toured-victorian-britain/ Between 1891 and 1893, members of The African Choir, a South African musical group, toured Britain to raise money for a technical college in their home countries to support the growth of the black workforce. The choir performed “to great acclaim and large audiences in the principal halls and for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, […]]]>

Between 1891 and 1893, members of The African Choir, a South African musical group, toured Britain to raise money for a technical college in their home countries to support the growth of the black workforce. The choir performed “to great acclaim and large audiences in the principal halls and for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, [a royal residence in the Isle of Wight]“, explains Renée Mussai, principal curator at Autograph. Shoreditch Art Gallery is renowned for championing photography that explores socio-political issues.

The choir had 16 members. There were seven women, seven men and two young altar boys, Albert Jonas and John Xiniwe. During this trip, portraits of the singers were made on glass plates, before the images were forgotten for more than a century. These included vibrant images of the two young boys, Albert and John, both short and thin with short hair, often laughing with each other and playing with props in baggy pants and shirts.

“The set was shot by the London Stereoscopic Company, which was one of the world’s very first commercial photo agencies, if not the very first, working much like Getty Images does today,” says editor Jennifer Jeffries. archival chief at Getty Images, noting that “a plausible explanation” for the images of the choir that did not make it into the history books is that they did not fit the unflattering narrative and stereotypes of Africans in the ‘era.

“Some members were graduates of the Alice campus of Lovedale College,” she adds. Lovedale College is a mission school in the Eastern Cape Province and today Alice is their most rural campus, focusing on agriculture. “It’s unclear who actually shot the set, but I think it may have been Reinhold Thiele, a German photographer, who was working for LSC at the time.”

But, despite having been mostly inaccessible for nearly 130 years, these images can now be found online as part of Getty Images’ Black History and Culture Collection (BHCC), an initiative that provides free access to a curated selection of nearly 30,000 rare images from Africa. and the black diaspora in the United Kingdom and the United States from the 19th century to the present day. Kwame Asiedu, project manager for BHCC, believes that if photos such as those in the archive had been available to him as a young boy, it would have helped him find solutions to the questions he had growing up about being a child. to be a black man in Britain. “Images are powerful,” he says. “I’m not saying that my questions would have been answered, but these images would have given me some comfort.”

What excites Kwame most today is how creatives and educators will use the BHCC to teach black people about their history. “Without these photos, you could not carry out certain projects. I used to teach at a Saturday school, and we would often find ourselves in a situation where we saw a picture, and we just couldn’t use them,” he says. “When you read why people want to use the collection, the projects they describe are vast and expansive.”

The photos of The African Choir are among the earliest BHCC photographs. According to Renée, the images were unearthed at the Hulton Archive, a division of Getty widely considered to be one of the oldest and most comprehensive archives of all time. They were found in 2014 as part of Autograph’s The Missing Chapter: Black Chronicles – a research program, a set of exhibitions and a forthcoming book. The glass plate negatives were among several others and wrapped in parchment paper.

“That’s one of the reasons they look so ‘contemporary’,” says Renée. “It is incredibly rare to be able to print and scan archival photographs from this era working with the original plate materials, as opposed to the more familiar, often faded, vintage sepia prints.” Therefore, photos could be reproduced in black and white at a high quality for Autograph’s Black Chronicles exhibitions. “The photograph itself is remarkable, as are the expressive faces of the models – looking closely, every detail is meticulously recorded, every pore of Eleanor Xiniwe’s beautiful skin is preserved under a microscope, every crease in the fabric of her draped garment and its registered headscarf for prosperity.” Eleanor was the wife of Paul Xiniwe, the oldest member of The African Choir and a member herself.

What also sets these images apart today is how the singers are depicted. According to Renée, although the portraits conform to certain conventions and stereotypes of the time, both in terms of Victorian studio portraits and depictions of black characters, “they also disrupt these ideas”, as shown in the photos of ‘Albert and John.

In one particular image, one of the boys sits in front of a large camera as if posing for a photo. At the same time, the other stands behind the camera as if taking a picture. Renée believes the image opens up a “wonderful and deeply contemporary urgent conversation about agency, subjectivity, performativity and self-representation”.

A boy is seated posing in front of a Victorian camera.  The other boy is behind the camera and gesturing as if he is about to take a picture
South African singers Albert Jonas and John Xiniwe, of The African Choir, at a staged photographic portrait session, 1891. The choir, made up of seven different South African tribes, toured Britain from 1891 to 1893 to raise funds for a technical college in their home country. (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

According to the research, the photos were created “as promotional images to advertise the choir’s tour,” says Renée, which she notes national media shared with the public as singers dressed in “indigenous costumes “. “It was important to include the contrasting images of the individual members of the choir both dressed in what the managers and probably what the white audience saw as the expected ‘exotic’ outfits, but also in ‘alternative’ clothing that , again, were probably obligated to engage the public at the time,” adds Jennifer, the archive’s editor.

Fittingly, what they were wearing in these images also highlights the nature of their performances. Their shows were split into two halves. In the first part of the show, they performed African folk songs and compositions by South African musicians, the second – Christian hymns in English.

“The transition between the two acts was signaled by a change in costume – from ‘indigenous’ African dress to ‘local’ Victorian attire,” says Renée. “A sartorially and musically orchestrated transformation to illustrate a generative journey from ‘native’ to ‘civilized’ that was a common trope in popular 19th century ‘exotic’ entertainment. »

As uncomfortable as these problematic little details may be by modern standards, they highlight a largely unknown and multifaceted part of black British history in the Victorian era. The one that, at first glance, seems to have been made today. “They have the impression of belonging simultaneously to the present and to the past,” says Renée.

The next autograph book Black Chronicles edited by Renée Mussai will be published in 2023. Getty Images’ Black History and Culture collection is available on line.

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Content Creators Can Now Transcode Blackmagic RAW Media Files in the Cloud with Alteon.io | New https://knightbilham.com/content-creators-can-now-transcode-blackmagic-raw-media-files-in-the-cloud-with-alteon-io-new/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 16:16:51 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/content-creators-can-now-transcode-blackmagic-raw-media-files-in-the-cloud-with-alteon-io-new/ BURBANK, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sept. 7, 2022– Content creators can now save hundreds of hours each year with Alteon.ioan all-in-one hub for professional creatives, which today announced that it can automatically transcode Blackmagic RAW (.braw) files natively in the cloud. Blackmagic cameras and devices, capable of capturing video in resolutions up to 12K, have been staples for […]]]>

BURBANK, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sept. 7, 2022–

Content creators can now save hundreds of hours each year with Alteon.ioan all-in-one hub for professional creatives, which today announced that it can automatically transcode Blackmagic RAW (.braw) files natively in the cloud.

Blackmagic cameras and devices, capable of capturing video in resolutions up to 12K, have been staples for production professionals for the better part of a decade, thanks to their ultra-competitive prices and quality of remarkable picture. Blackmagic has democratized broadcast-quality hardware by making it affordable for mainstream and independent creators, a mission Alteon has taken on for digital workflows and remote collaboration.

“We want to meet our users where they already are,” says Matt Cimaglia, co-founder of Alteon. “The overlap between Blackmagic users and Alteon users is significant: it’s a diverse group of professionals, including freelance creators and members of larger teams, who want to save money without sacrificing quality.At the same time, Alteon shares Blackmagic’s desire to create new opportunities for storytellers of all backgrounds by fostering accessibility and inclusivity within our creative community.

Alteon is a content management system built on the principles of flexible cloud storage, world-class security, and Web3 integrations. When content creators upload media to Alteon, Alteon’s proprietary high-speed transcoder automatically transcodes usable proxy versions for easy real-time manipulation, sharing, online viewing and commenting. Blackmagic’s .braw is the premier professional file format that Alteon Transcoder can handle, along with many other video file types, including .mxf, .avi, .mov, and .mp4. Alteon users can then access both the transcoded proxies and the full-resolution original files, which are never altered in any way.

For creatives shooting on Blackmagic cameras, this new breakthrough will save hundreds of hours of transcoding, a process that typically makes computers slow or even unusable.

As Blackmagic Design continually releases new high-resolution cameras, including the recently unveiled Blackmagic 6K G2 Pocket Cinema CameraPost-production professionals will benefit greatly from the time saved when uploading and transcoding 6K footage, or even higher resolutions with the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K.

Alteon Transcoder won’t stop at just .braw files. In the coming months, Alteon will support RED and Arri RAW file formats, paving the way for future updates to continue improving production workflows for creators across the industry.

About Alteon.io

Alteon.io is a SaaS platform that facilitates collaboration between creatives, brands and studios. By leveraging Web3 technologies, this comprehensive production ecosystem addresses key issues faced by production professionals by helping users collaborate seamlessly, work more efficiently, and organize assets more intuitively. Alteon is a subsidiary of Third Summit. To learn more, visit alteon.io.

About Blackmagic Design

Blackmagic Design creates the world’s highest quality video editing products, digital cameras, color correctors, video converters, video surveillance systems, routers, live production switchers, disk recorders, waveform monitors and real-time film scanners for feature film, post-production and broadcast television. Industries. Blackmagic Design’s DeckLink capture cards have revolutionized the quality and affordability of post-production, while Emmy™-winning DaVinci color correction products have dominated the TV and film industry since 1984.

Blackmagic Design continues its breakthrough innovations, including 6G-SDI and 12G-SDI products and stereoscopic and Ultra HD 3D workflows. Founded by world-renowned editors and post-production engineers, Blackmagic Design has offices in the US, UK, Japan, Singapore and Australia. For more information, visit www.blackmagicdesign.com.

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]]> UK’s ‘first multi-view stereoscopic VR cave’ installed at uni https://knightbilham.com/uks-first-multi-view-stereoscopic-vr-cave-installed-at-uni/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 14:30:26 +0000 https://knightbilham.com/uks-first-multi-view-stereoscopic-vr-cave-installed-at-uni/ ST Engineering Antycip has supplied Oxford Brookes University with what it claims is the “first multi-view stereoscopic VR CAVE system” in service in the UK. The university’s mandate to its long-time partner was to enhance its advanced, industry-standard research and teaching facilities in engineering and computer science. The virtual environment comprises two operating modes: “single […]]]>

ST Engineering Antycip has supplied Oxford Brookes University with what it claims is the “first multi-view stereoscopic VR CAVE system” in service in the UK.

The university’s mandate to its long-time partner was to enhance its advanced, industry-standard research and teaching facilities in engineering and computer science.

The virtual environment comprises two operating modes: “single mode”, in which only the vision of the main user is tracked and dynamically corrected in his eyes; and “multi-view mode”, which allows two people to be tracked and each see a different perspective-corrected image when wearing the corresponding 3D glasses.

John Mould, Business Development Manager at ST Engineering Antycip, said: “We believe this is the first multi-view stereoscopic VR CAVE system currently in service in the UK. One of our biggest challenges for the CAVE was installing the highest quality rear projection screen substrates, which we sourced from Barco – their vertically mounted UDM laser projectors, each fitted with optical unique bent lens, makes the footprint of this CAVE very compact, to further aid its ability to be installed in a tight space. Combined with an array of high-powered PC image generators each featuring an NVIDIA Quadro RTX A6000 graphics card, the CAVE is capable of delivering high-resolution visuals at 2560×1600 pixels per side, delivering 3840×2400 pixels at 120Hz .

Vicon tracking cameras and two wireless navigation devices support dual perspectives tracked simultaneously, making this CAVE a step up from the restrictions of the past, where only one person could benefit from their corrected sight. Users can visually intercept their solid or fluid dynamic models through Techviz, which is also capable of delivering any Unity-based visual datasets the university may wish to explore. The software base allows examination of the university’s research on vertical wind turbines deployed as marine farms by combining multiple visual applications displayed simultaneously using the Techviz Fusion module, which can allow CFD data to be overlaid with data Relevant CAD, for example. “This technology is advancing every year – high-quality CAVEs of this nature are becoming more desirable and more capable than ever,” adds Mr. Mold. Gordana Collier, director of the university’s School of Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics, says CAVE’s capabilities have sparked interest among arts, architecture and health students. “The CAVE is a terrific blank canvas, allowing creativity and flexibility for a wide range of users, with opportunities for many disciplines, unlike other more personalized platforms,” she adds.

“The quality is superb and we are excited to have ways to implement new learning and improve our research. Our vision is to have an open access approach and to share and exchange models and libraries with universities around the world.

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